Mercedes E-Class Estate review

Category: Estate car

Section: Costs & verdict

Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 interior infotainment
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 front cornering
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 rear cornering
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 interior dashboard
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 interior rear seats
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 interior infotainment
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 front left cornering
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 right tracking
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 rear left cornering
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 alloy wheel detail
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 interior front seats
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 interior detail
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 interior detail
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 boot open
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 front cornering
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 rear cornering
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 interior dashboard
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 interior rear seats
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 interior infotainment
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 front left cornering
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 right tracking
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 rear left cornering
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 alloy wheel detail
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 interior front seats
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 interior detail
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 interior detail
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate 2021 boot open
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In this section:
  • Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2
  • Equipment, options and extras
  • Reliability
  • Safety and security

Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2

Our recommended Mercedes E-Class Estate is the E220d in AMG Line Premium trim. It will set cash buyers back a similar amount to the equivalent BMW 5 Series Touring (the 520d M Sport). The Audi A6 Avant 40 TDI S line and Volvo V90 B4(D) R Design are a bit pricier. However, the E-Class Estate has better resale values than the V90, and should lose about the percentage of its list price (over three years) as the A6 Avant and 5 Series Touring. It's not a cheap car to service, though. PCP finance costs are generally competitive with its rivals, but check out our New Car Deals pages to see the best prices available.

The E220d will average 45mpg without too much trouble in the real world. That's pretty competitive, as are its CO2 emissions. It's also RDE2 compliant, which is good for your company car tax bill, but if you're looking for the cheapest benefit-in-kind (BIK) tax, you should seriously consider the E300de plug-in hybrid.

Equipment, options and extras

Every E-Class Estate comes brimming with kit. The entry-level Sport trim features cruise control, power-folding door mirrors, two-zone climate control, 17in alloy wheels (these offer the best ride), heated front seats and leather seat trim (plus the safety kit, infotainment features and visibility aids we've already mentioned).

If you can stretch to the upper-mid-spec AMG Line Premium trim, we think that's the pick of the range. It's roughly the same price as a 5 Series Touring M Sport and adds extras including keyless entry, 19in alloys and a gesture-controlled powered boot lid. 

Overview

It's not cheap, but the Mercedes E-Class Estate is classy and impressively refined. It's also generally comfortable, easy to drive, well equipped and a compelling option in the luxury estate car sector. Crucially, its boot beats the BMW 5 Series Touring's and Volvo V90's for luggage room, although the V90 does have more spacious rear seats. The E300de plug-in hybrid has the best fuel economy of any equivalent PHEV once the battery is depleted.

  • Massive boot
  • Well equipped
  • E300de plug-in hybrid fuel economy
  • Not as fun to drive as some rivals
  • Expensive to buy
  • Unsettled low-speed ride