BMW 5 Series Touring review

Category: Estate car

Section: Costs & verdict

BMW 5 Series Touring 2020 infotainment
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2021
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2021 rear tracking
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2020 dashboard
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2020 rear seats
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2020 infotainment
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2021 right hand panning
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2021 rear light detail
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2020 dashboard
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2021 boot open
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2021
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2021 rear tracking
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2020 dashboard
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2020 rear seats
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2020 infotainment
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2021 right hand panning
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2021 rear light detail
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2020 dashboard
  • BMW 5 Series Touring 2021 boot open
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In this section:
  • Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2
  • Equipment, options and extras
  • Reliability
  • Safety and security

Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2

Broadly speaking, the BMW 5 Series Touring is priced in line with its closest rivals, the Audi A6 Avant, Jaguar XF Sportbrake and Mercedes-Benz E-Class Estate. The 520d is by far the most popular version, mainly due to its mid-fifties official average fuel economy and competitive CO2, which equate to a lower band of company car tax than the E220d Estate. And the 520d is RDE2 compliment, so you won't need to pay the 4% diesel surcharge. 

Then again, the 530e Touring plug-in hybrid is the best for company car users, with fantastic tax breaks that cut your company car tax rate by roughly a third. And if you can keep the battery charged and make use of its electric range you’ll save a fortune on fuel. Just remember that if you don’t charge the battery and you're running on the petrol engine alone, the average fuel economy will be a lot lower than the diesel.

Equipment, options and extras

Entry-level SE trim is the one we’d go for. It’s the cheapest and still comes with plenty of luxuries. These include leather seat trim, heated front seats, dual-zone climate control, ambient interior lighting, cruise control, a powered tailgate, an auto-dimming rear-view mirror, 17in alloy wheels (18in on the more powerful engines), along with the infotainment system, LED headlights, the front and rear parking sensors and the rear-view camera we mentioned earlier. 

M Sport trim is extremely popular, thanks largely to its more aggressive body styling and bigger alloys. You don't get a lot of extra substance for the added cost, apart from sports front seats, privacy glass and a much stiffer ride courtesy of the M Suspension. A Pro Pack can be added to M Sport models that adds even more visual garnish, including 20in wheels, black rather than chrome exterior trim and blue M Sport brake calipers. On more powerful versions, it also adds adaptive suspension that improves the ride.

Overview

In the right specification, the BMW 5 Series Touring is quiet, smooth, classy, comfortable and well equipped. It’s also very practical, although it can't quite match the enormous boot that you get with a Mercedes E-Class Estate.

  • Frugal 520d and company-car-tax-beating 530e plug-in hybrid
  • Excellent infotainment system
  • Beautifully made, high-quality interior
  • Volvo V90 has more rear-seat space
  • Mercedes E-Class Estate has an even bigger boot
  • Unsettled ride with M Sport suspension and bigger alloy wheels
New car deals
Save up to £8,735
Target Price from £42,700
Save up to £8,735
or from £473pm
Swipe to see used and leasing deals
Nearly new deals
From £40,000
Leasing deals
From £551pm