Citroën e-Dispatch review

Category: Electric Van

Section: Introduction

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Citroën e-Dispatch 2021 front right static
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  • Citroën e-Dispatch 2021 front right static
  • Citroën e-Dispatch 2021 interior driver display
  • Citroën e-Dispatch 2021 interior seats
  • Citroën e-Dispatch 2021 rear doors open
  • Citroën e-Dispatch 2021 interior infotainment
  • Citroën e-Dispatch 2021 front right static
  • Citroën e-Dispatch 2021 right static
  • Citroën e-Dispatch 2021 right static side doors open
  • Citroën e-Dispatch 2021 rear static
  • Citroën e-Dispatch 2021 badge detail
  • Citroën e-Dispatch 2021 charging socket
  • Citroën e-Dispatch 2021 rear doors open
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Introduction

What Car? says...

Electric vans are a bit like London buses – you wait ages for one then a few turn up once. In the case of the Citroën e-Dispatch and its cousins, it's actually four.

You see, the e-Dispatch shares a platform with three other electric-powered load-luggers, the Peugeot e-Expert, Toyota Proace Electric and Vauxhall Vivaro-e (essentially, they're all the same vehicle).

The idea of an electrified Citroen van is nothing new, of course. The French manufacturer has offered the electric Berlingo small van in the UK for a while, but the e-Dispatch and its three close relatives could be the first to address the primary concerns of first-time EV buyers. Namely load-carrying ability (particularly reduced payloads due to the weight of batteries) and range anxiety.

Citroën has tried to reduce the fear of running out of power by giving buyers the option of two different battery sizes: 50kWh and 75kWh. They give the e-Dispatch an official range of 143 or 205 miles respectively according to the WLTP test procedure. All models are powered by a 100kW (134bhp) electric motor producing 192lb ft of torque.

The e-Dispatch is available in three body sizes, which opens it up to a greater number of buyers, from those who want something similar in size to the diminutive Renault Kangoo Maxi all the way up to those who require a full-sized van (load volumes range from 5.1m3 to 6.6m3). Payload capacity isn’t as far off its diesel counterpart as you might expect. 

Competition for the e-Expert comes in the shape of the Maxus E Deliver 3, Mercedes eVito, Nissan e-NV200, VW ABT e-Transporter and, of course, its closely related cousins, the Peugeot e-Expert, Toyota Proace Electric and Vauxhall Vivaro-e. There are also several hybrid models you could consider, including the Ford Transit Custom PHEV and the London taxi-based LEVC VN5.

Don't forget, we can help you find the best leasing deals through the free What Car? Leasing section, where you can get a quote for whichever make and model of car or van fits your personal or business needs.

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