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Used Peugeot 208 2019-present review

Category: Small car

Section:

What is it like?

Peugeot 208 2020 RHD front tracking
  • Peugeot 208 2020 RHD front tracking
  • Peugeot 208 2020 RHD dashboard
  • Peugeot 208 2020 RHD infotainment
  • Peugeot 208 2020 RHD boot open
  • Peugeot 208 2020 RHD right panning
  • Peugeot 208 2020 RHD rear tracking
  • Peugeot 208 2020 RHD front tracking
  • Peugeot 208 2020 RHD dashboard
  • Peugeot 208 2020 RHD infotainment
  • Peugeot 208 2020 RHD boot open
  • Peugeot 208 2020 RHD right panning
  • Peugeot 208 2020 RHD rear tracking
Used Peugeot 208 2019-present review
Star rating

What's the used Peugeot 208 hatchback like?

While we may not be the last word in fashion, the original Peugeot 208 certainly brought some welcomed French flair and style to the small car segment. On the flipside, this wasn't exactly matched with class-leading substance. 

The latest, second-generation model is a big step up, however. It has much-improved road manners and a range of impressively economical engines, making it a superior buy both new and (more importantly here) used. Indeed, if you’re not fussy about a premium badge, the high-spec 208s even hold up well against such plush rivals as the Audi A1 and Mini Hatch

On the road, the Puretech 75 is a little weedy, whereas the Puretech 100 is probably all you'll need. It’s lively and gutsy when you work it, and it's absolutely ideal for propelling you along on A-roads and motorways without any fuss. The Puretech 130 is available only with an automatic gearbox and packs more punch than the Puretech 100 but does come at a higher price, even used. The 1.5 BlueHDi 100 has even more low-rev punch than the Puretech 100 petrol for more effortless performance.

The e-208 has a 45kWh battery that powers a 134bhp electric motor – enough to propel the car, in our tests, from 0-60mph in a spritely 7.5sec. That means it’s comfortably quicker than a Renault Zoe, although not quite as nippy as a Kia e-Niro or Mini Electric

When it comes to the twisties, the 208 isn't quite as sporty as the tiny, kart-like steering wheel would suggest and the steering doesn’t give you a great sense of connection to the road. It’s not as much fun to drive as the Ford Fiesta, for example.

The 208 has softer suspension than close rivals such as the Renault Clio, allowing it to glide along the motorway, feeling like a much bigger car than it is. However, it can be a little bouncy at times, although it deals with potholes well enough. There's some wind noise at higher speeds, but for the most part road noise is at a minimum. Visibility over the shoulder is reduced by the 208’s tapering roof and thick pillars, but the rear parking sensors help make up for the limited view out the back when reversing.