Click on the banner

Hyundai Kona Electric review

Category: Small Electric

Section: Performance & drive

Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 RHD instruments
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 front tracking
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 RHD instruments
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 rear seats
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 infotainment
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 front cornering
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 front right static
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 rear static
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 front left detail
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 instruments detail
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 boot open
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 front tracking
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 RHD instruments
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 rear seats
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 infotainment
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 front cornering
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 front right static
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 rear static
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 front left detail
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 instruments detail
  • Hyundai Kona Electric 2021 boot open

Performance & drive

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

If you go for the Hyundai Kona Electric with a 39kWh battery, you'll get a 134bhp electric motor, which gives it lively performance. We shattered the claimed acceleration time and managed 0-60mph in 7.9sec, faster than an MG ZS EV, Nissan Leaf, Renault Zoe and Vauxhall Mokka-e.

In our Real Range tests, the smaller 39kWh battery managed 158 miles. That’s competitive, but the 64kWh version kept going for a mega 259 miles – a few miles further than the Kia e-Niro, which shares the same battery and motor as the Kona. It also puts the 64kWh well ahead of other small electric SUVs such as the DS 3 Crossback E-Tense, Mazda MX-30, Peugeot e-2008 and Vauxhall Mokka-e.

When you lift off the accelerator pedal, you feel the car slowing down quite quickly thanks to the regenerative braking, a system that allows the car to harvest energy that would otherwise be wasted to replenish the battery. You can increase that braking effect using the paddles on the steering wheel, and you can even make it so strong that it will bring the car to a complete stop without touching the brake pedal. Regardless of how it's set, the brakes are predictable, allowing you to stop more smoothly than most rivals, including the ID.3.

In corners, the Kona Electric leans less than a ZS EV or Leaf. In most other respects, though, it's not great to drive spiritedly. The ID.3 and Kia e-Niro are better handling cars that offer more accurate steering and have more grip to exploit if the mood takes you.

Those rivals are more comfortable, too. Whatever speed you’re doing, the Kona Electric jostles around over smaller road imperfections, something that can become quite annoying after you've been driving for a while.

Naturally, being an electric car, the Kona Electric is as peaceful as a cathedral at town speeds. Once you pick up the pace, road and wind noise start to increase, and by the time you’re cruising at 70mph there’s more of both than there is in the Peugeot e-208 and Vauxhall Mokka-e.