Peugeot e-2008 review

Category: Electric car

The e-2008 is quiet, comfy and smart inside but rival electric SUVs have longer ranges

Peugeot e-2008 front cornering
  • Peugeot e-2008 front cornering
  • Peugeot e-2008 interior dashboard
  • Peugeot e-2008 boot open
  • Peugeot e-2008 interior driver display
  • Peugeot e-2008 right driving
  • Peugeot e-2008 front cornering
  • Peugeot e-2008 front cornering
  • Peugeot e-2008 rear right driving
  • Peugeot e-2008 rear cornering
  • Peugeot e-2008 left static boot open
  • Peugeot e-2008 rear static boot open
  • Peugeot e-2008 interior front seats
  • Peugeot e-2008 interior back seats
  • Peugeot e-2008 interior steering wheel detail
  • Peugeot e-2008 interior infotainment
  • Peugeot e-2008 interior air-con controls
  • Peugeot e-2008 interior seat detail
  • Peugeot e-2008 boot detail
  • Peugeot e-2008 front cornering
  • Peugeot e-2008 interior dashboard
  • Peugeot e-2008 boot open
  • Peugeot e-2008 interior driver display
  • Peugeot e-2008 right driving
  • Peugeot e-2008 front cornering
  • Peugeot e-2008 front cornering
  • Peugeot e-2008 rear right driving
  • Peugeot e-2008 rear cornering
  • Peugeot e-2008 left static boot open
  • Peugeot e-2008 rear static boot open
  • Peugeot e-2008 interior front seats
  • Peugeot e-2008 interior back seats
  • Peugeot e-2008 interior steering wheel detail
  • Peugeot e-2008 interior infotainment
  • Peugeot e-2008 interior air-con controls
  • Peugeot e-2008 interior seat detail
  • Peugeot e-2008 boot detail
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by
Doug Revolta
Published05 February 2024

Introduction

What Car? says...

The Peugeot e-2008 is what you might call a "stealth electric SUV". Not because its battery and motor mean it's quiet on the move, but because you'd be hard-pressed to tell it apart at a glance from its petrol-powered twin, the 2008.

In other words, the e-2008 doesn't have the outlandish styling some of the electric car models you'll see have adopted. Whether you like that or not is up to you – we're here to tell you whether or not it's worth buying.

First you need to know what the e-2008 competes against in the increasingly competitive electric SUV class. Well, the main rivals include the Hyundai Kona Electric, the Kia Niro EV and the Smart #1.

Read on to find out how we rate the Peugeot e-2008 for performance, driving range, practicality, comfort, value and more.

Peugeot e-2008 rear cornering

Overview

The Peugeot E-2008 has a classy and comfortable interior with a decent level of practicality but it doesn't stand out in enough areas to be a strong competitor. It’s also predicted to be expensive to run for private buyers due to depreciation. Top-spec versions look expensive, so we reckon mid-level Allure is the best trim choice.

  • Smart, solid-feeling interior
  • Impressively quiet and comfortable
  • Strong efficiency makes the most of smaller battery capacity
  • Some rivals have a longer range
  • Driving position won’t suit everyone
  • Limited rear seat space
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Our Pick

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Peugeot 2008 1.2 PureTech 130 Allure 5dr review
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Performance & drive

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

The Peugeot e-2008 gets a 154bhp electric motor that drives the front wheels, and unless you count the petrol Peugeot 2008 there are no other power options. And that’s just fine: a family SUV hardly needs to offer gratuitous levels of performance.

Even so, it does have a decent mid-speed turn of pace. It picks up well for a faster motorway merge or a cheeky junction exit, and feels more than powerful enough to give you confidence in any kind of everyday driving.

We managed a 0-60mph time of 8.5 seconds in our tests, which is nothing special, but the smooth ebb and flow of the acceleration is good. If you want a bit more pace, consider the Hyundai Kona Electric or the Smart #1.

The brakes are effective when bringing the e-2008 to a stop (requiring less distance than the Kona Electric and #1 in our tests) but the inconsistent response from the pedal itself makes it tricky to stop smoothly.

The regenerative braking system is quite mild and doesn’t really feel any different to the way a normal petrol or diesel car slows down if you let it coast.

Hitting the "B" button on the gear selector brings heavier regen, but it’s not as strong as the one-pedal driving you can get in a Kona Electric or Smart #1. It’s also not adaptive, like the system in the Renault Megane E-Tech.

The low-speed ride is comfy, even on the bigger 18in alloy wheels available. It soaks up bumps and scruffy surfaces easily, with a less choppy ride than a #1. It's not a comfortable at higher speeds but it’s still pretty good.

The e-2008 keeps body lean in check when cornering, despite the soft suspension. Grip levels could be higher though, and while the steering is well-weighted, the quick response can make the car feel a touch nervous when you initially apply lock. That's partly due to the way the small steering wheel emphasises steering inputs. The Smart #1 is more fun to drive.

Peugeot 2008 image
Skip the showroom and find out more online

Other than a bit of wind noise at motorway speeds, the e-2008 is one of the quietest electric SUVs to travel in. There’s barely any whine from the electric motor, and road noise is really well suppressed.

On the Peugeot website you’ll see that the e-2008 has a 54kWh battery, but that’s the total capacity. In fact, you get 50.8kWh of lithium-ion cells that will actually be charging and discharging (some cells are isolated to help with the battery’s longevity and performance).

With a standard heat pump helping with its cold weather efficiency, its official WLTP range is a respectable 250 miles – not far off less-efficient but bigger battery rivals including the MG ZS EV and the #1.

Thanks to its efficient motor, the e-2008 achieved a real-world range of 183 miles when we tested it in the winter, while the #1 managed a few miles more.

Driving overview

Strengths Comfortable ride; impressive refinement

Weaknesses Mediocre range; lots of rivals are quicker; grabby brakes

Peugeot e-2008 interior dashboard

Interior

The interior layout, fit and finish

The interior of the Peugeot e-2008 is smart with a striking, modern-looking dashboard, and a tactile blend of gloss plastics and dense-feeling textiles.

It’s comfortable too, with plenty of side support and adjustment to the seats, although the seat is a bit narrow and lumbar adjustment is only standard on First Edition models, although it’s an optional extra on GT.

You don’t sit that high up, though – only a touch higher than you do in a normal hatchback electric car such as the VW ID.3 and lower than you do in the taller Hyundai Kona Electric, the MG ZS EV and the Smart #1.

The view over your shoulder and out of the back of the e-2008 isn’t as clear as in most rivals due to its small windows.

However, rear parking sensors come as standard on all trims with front ones added on Allure trim and above. You’ll need GT trim for a rear-view camera, or you can add it to cheaper models as part of an option pack.

There’s plenty of reach and height adjustment for the steering wheel, and the driver’s seat adjusts for height, but it can still take a while to find a comfy seating position as a result of the tiny steering wheel.

Peugeot's thinking is that having a small, low-set steering wheel allows the instruments to be placed higher so you don’t have to look far from the road to read them. Unfortunately, many people will find the top of the steering wheel obscures the dials unless the wheel is set unnaturally low.

The interior can feel a bit gloomy, with lots of dark material finishes, but adding the optional panoramic glass roof that’s available on Allure and GT trims will help to alleviate that.

Every e-2008 gets a 10in colour touchscreen set into the upper dashboard, with wireless Android Auto and Apple CarPlay smartphone mirroring.

There’s a touch-sensitive home button that’s useful for reverting to a page and you can store your own shortcuts, which is useful, but the Kona Electric has physical switches and knobs that are easier to find and use.

You have to go for Allure or GT trim to get high-definition graphics on the touchscreen. Even the best system in the e-2008 is less clear and has smaller icons than those fitted to the Kona Electric, the Kia Niro EV and the Smart #1.

Despite software updates brought in with the 2023 facelift, sifting through menus can be a chore, with the animations it displays between them making it feel slow. Some submenus are difficult to locate, while the bunched-up icons on certain pages mean aiming for the correct can be tricky. 

The First Edition launch trim adds built-in sat-nav with live traffic updates and over-the-air software updates. Other versions will rely on smartphone integration for navigation.

Interior overview

Strengths Classy look and feel; supportive seats

Weaknesses Climate controls mostly operated through touchscreen; driving position won’t suit everyone

Peugeot e-2008 boot open

Passenger & boot space

How it copes with people and clutter

Even tall drivers will find enough space in the Peugeot e-2008, with good head and leg room available.

It feels more confined than some of the bigger cars in the electric SUV class, though – it's narrower and has a lower roofline than a Hyundai Kona Electric or Smart #1, for example.

Storage space is reasonable, with space under the centre armrest and cubbies dotted around, but the door pockets aren’t huge and the glovebox is small.

It’s fine for rear-seat passengers, and six-footers will have enough space not to feel pinched, but you'll have more space to stretch out your legs in the Kona Electric, the Kia Niro EV, the MG ZS EV and the Smart #1.

Squeezing in a third occupant in the rear is more of a challenge than it is in rivals, due to a hump in the floor robbing leg room and less shoulder space than a Kona and #1.

More positively, you’ll be better off in the e-2008 than you would in the back of a DS 3 E-Tense, a Mazda MX-30 or a Vauxhall Mokka Electric. They're similar-sized cars but have far less appealing rear-seat accommodation.

The e-2008 doesn’t provide a great deal of seating flexibility. You have to opt for mid-spec Allure trim to get a height-adjustable front passenger seat and lumbar support isn't available. The rear seats don’t slide or recline but they do split and fold 60/40.

There's no second boot under the bonnet, but the one at the back is just as big as it is in the regular 2008. In our tests, we managed to fit five carry-on suitcases below the parcel shelf – the same as in the Niro EV – which translates to a reasonably sized buggy or a good amount of shopping.

There’s also a decent amount of underfloor storage thanks to the standard height-adjustable boot floor, but you can’t add a spare wheel – even a space saver – because the batteries take up the space beneath the boot.

Practicality overview

Strengths Decent rear boot; plenty of space for four 6ft adults

Weaknesses Some rivals have more versatile rear seats; no front boot; small glovebox

Peugeot e-2008 interior driver display

Buying & owning

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

The Peugeot e-2008 is priced broadly in line with its rivals, costing a little more than an equivalent Hyundai Kona Electric or Smart #1 but a bit less than a Kia Niro EV. The MG ZS EV undercuts all of them by a hefty chunk. 

Cash discounts are available if you’re a private buyer, although monthly payments are less competitive for those looking to buy on PCP finance. It’s worth bearing in mind that the e-2008 will lose its value far more quickly than a Kona Electric or a #1, making it more expensive to run.

For company car drivers, the e-2008 falls into the same benefit-in-kind (BIK) tax bracket as its rivals so it should cost a very similar amount per month in salary sacrifices. If you pay for your own electricity, the e-2008’s efficient motor means you spend a little less on charging to cover those miles.

The e-2008 has a maximum charging speed charge of up 100kW, which is good enough for a 10-80% charge using a 150kW public charger in around half an hour.

A 50kW rapid charger will do the same in under an hour – roughly on a par with many rivals, and a touch faster than the Kona Electric, the Niro EV and the ZS EV. A standard 7kW home wallbox will deliver a full charge in less than eight hours. An 11kW DC on-board charger is available as an option.

The e-2008's entry-level Active trim is sparsely equipped. It doesn’t even get alloy wheels, settling instead for 16in steel wheels with trims. You can’t option alloy wheels either. Still, it does get automatic lights and wipers, LED daytime running lights, climate control and a six-speaker sound system.

Allure is a good choice to balance cost and comforts. It adds front parking sensors, 17in alloy wheels, gloss-black roof bars, part-leatherette upholstery and two USB charging ports for rear passengers.

GT has interior style updates, a contrast roof, full adaptive LED headlights, wireless phone-charging and keyless entry, but is pricey. The limited-run First Edition trim adds Alcantara seats that are heated up front and sat-nav.

Euro NCAP awarded the e-2008 five stars out of five overall for safety, but found it less safe than the DS 3 E-Tense for occupants, with concerns about chest injuries for a child in a side impact. It’s still a very safe car, but the Mazda MX-30 EV did even better in safety tests.

All e-2008s have automatic emergency braking (AEB) and lane assist. Allure trim upgrades the AEB to detect pedestrians and cyclists. Adaptive cruise control and blind-spot monitoring are optional on Allure trim and up.

When it comes to reliability, Peugeot as a manufacturer came 21st out of 32 brands in the 2023 What Car? Reliability Survey. That puts it at a similar level to Volkswagen, but below Hyundai, Kia, MG and Renault.

You get a three-year, unlimited mileage warranty, with the battery covered separately for eight years or 100,000 miles. That's fairly average, but Kia gives you a seven-year warranty.

Costs overview

Strengths Five-star safety rating; reasonable charging speeds; efficient motor reduces charging costs

Weaknesses Entry-level trim sparsely equipped; Peugeot’s disappointing reliability record; loses its value quickly

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FAQs

  • At the time of writing, the starting price of the e-2008 is just under £37,000. For the latest prices – and discounts – see our new Peugeot deals pages

  • The e-2008 is only available with one battery size and one electric motor set-up, but there are three trim levels to choose from – Active, Allure and GT (plus a launch version called First Edition). We think Allure represents the best balance of cost and kit.

  • The e-2008’s boot is the same size as a Peugeot 2008 boot – 434 litres – so it can swallow five carry-on suitcases or a reasonably-sized buggy. That’s up there with practical electric car rivals (the Kia Niro EV for example). There’s room to store charging cables under the height-adjustable boot floor.

At a glance
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RRP price range £24,180 - £40,700
Number of trims (see all)3
Number of engines (see all)5
Available fuel types (which is best for you?)petrol, electric
MPG range across all versions 48.9 - 62.1
Available doors options 5
Warranty 3 years / 60000 miles
Company car tax at 20% (min/max) £71 / £1,852
Company car tax at 40% (min/max) £143 / £3,703
Available colours