The cars with the biggest boots

Forget the official figures. What Car?'s unique way of measuring boot space reveals the cars that really have the biggest luggage capacities...

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by
Claire Evans
Published25 November 2023

Cars with the biggest boots Range Rover

Whether you’re a car boot sale fanatic, a habitual Ikea shopper or a parent with loads of child paraphernalia to transport, you know the importance of having a big boot. Size is hard to judge, though – just because a car has a footprint bigger than Sasquatch’s, doesn’t mean it’ll swallow a Louis Vuitton luggage set. 

So, we don't simply compare boot volume in litres, because that doesn't give a true representation of how much luggage a car will really swallow. To get a definitive answer on how much kit each model can carry, as part of every comprehensive road test, we also cram in as many carry-on suitcases as we can.

We use the space up to the load cover in hatchbacks, SUVs and MPVs, and seven-seaters are tested in five-seat mode (in other words, with the third row of seats folded down). Our cases measure 560 x 350 x 230mm. 

Read on to find out which cars will enable you to transport your family and all of their kit in comfort. Remember, in each case you can click the links to learn more about each model with our in-depth reviews, or see how much we can save you with our free New Car Deals service. 

Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Pleasant to drive with a comfortable ride
  • Hugely practical
  • Strong resale values

Weaknesses

  • Not available as a seven-seater - yet
  • Fiddly air-con controls and infotainment
  • Efficiency could be better

Boot size 1121 litres | Suitcases 16

The ID Buzz electric MPV is our 2023 Car of the Year because it’s safe, good to drive, holds its value very well and is extremely practical. 

It's available with five or seven seats, and you’ll have no trouble stowing everyone’s kit – even if you’re transporting a four-person polo team with saddles, helmets and mallets. Its tally of 16 carry-on suitcases is twice as many as you’ll fit in the BMW iX3 electric SUV. The entry-level Buzz has a step in the boot floor when you fold down the back seats, but other versions have a useful shelf that partitions the space. 

Read our in-depth Volkswagen ID Buzz review

Our pick: GLS 450d 4Matic AMG Line Premium + 5dr 9G-Tronic

0-62mph: 6.1 sec
MPG/range: 32.1mpg
CO2 emissions: 231g/km
Seats: 7
Boot: 355 litres
Insurance group: 50E
Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Effortless performance
  • Strong equipment levels
  • Wide range of versions

Weaknesses

  • Poorly controlled ride
  • Inconsistent interior quality
  • Rivals offer better low-speed manoeuvrability

Boot size 890 litres | Suitcases 11

At 5.2 metres long, the seven-seat GLS is Mercedes' flagship model, and the luxury SUV is almost as much of a behemoth as its BMW X7 rival. 

The GLS matches the X7 for suitcase-carrying ability too. We managed to fit 10 of our cases into the boot with the third row of seats folded down, plus one more  in the storage space under the boot floor. 

Even with all seven seats in use, there’s 355 litres of room in the GLS’s boot, which is almost as much as you get in a VW Golf. The two rearmost seats can be folded flat electrically when not needed, and the parcel shelf can be stowed in the underfloor compartment  in the boot. 

Read our in-depth Mercedes GLS review

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Our pick: xDrive40d MHT M Sport 5dr Step Auto

0-62mph: 5.9 sec
MPG/range: 36.2mpg
CO2 emissions: 205g/km
Seats: 7
Boot: 750 litres
Insurance group: 50E
Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Supremely quiet and comfortable
  • Incredibly spacious and practical
  • Great infotainment system

Weaknesses

  • There are cheaper alternatives
  • Looks won’t be to all tastes
  • No plug-in hybrid or electric option

Boot size 750 litres | Suitcases 11

Speaking of the X7, BMW’s biggest SUV is also its most practical model. It comes with seven seats as standard, and the two at the very back are more spacious than in the equivalent Mercedes-Benz GLS or Range Rover. That means when they’re folded flat into the floor, there’s masses of room for the whole family’s kit.  

The X7 has a storage compartment under the boot floor, and by including that in our test, we fitted in 11 cases. 

With all seven seats in use, there’s still enough space for a couple of cases. Like the smaller BMW X5 the X7 has a split tailgate with a separate lower section that can be folded down and used to sit on while you’re taking off muddy boots. 

Read our in-depth BMW X7 review

Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Hugely spacious boot and interior
  • Minimal wind noise
  • Well priced, and hybrid makes a cheap company car

Weaknesses

  • Hybrid isn’t as practical as other versions
  • Interior quality disappoints in places
  • Some estates are more fun to drive

Boot size 660 litres | Suitcases 11

The Superb Estate’s boot isn’t only more capacious than those of mainstream  rivals, including the Volkswagen Passat Estate. It’s also substantially bigger than those of luxury estate cars such as the BMW 5 Series Touring

The boot is wide, long and unimpeded by wheel arches, so it’s great for hauling bulky items. It also has useful features including shopping bag hooks, a  rechargeable torch and dividers that can be moved to create storage sections. 

The plug-in hybrid (PHEV) Superb Estate has a battery under the boot floor, so  its capacity is reduced and loses the underfloor compartment, but at 510  litres, it’s still a useful size. It's also worth bearing mind that an all-new Skoda Superb will arrive next year.

Read our in-depth Skoda Superb Estate review

Our pick: Long Range AWD 5dr Auto

0-62mph: 4.8 sec
CO2 emissions: 0g/km
Seats: 5
Insurance group: 48D
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Rapid acceleration
  • Great range between charges
  • Tesla’s charging infrastructure

Weaknesses

  • Unsettled ride
  • Noisy for an EV
  • A Model 3 is cheaper and better to drive

Boot size 971 litres (up to the rear screen and including front boot) | Suitcases 10

Think of the Model Y as the gym-buddy alter ego of the Tesla Model 3. It’s an electric SUV that’s bulkier than the Model 3 and a rival to the BMW iX3

Its boot is large and the opening is wide enough for a large pushchair. A parcel shelf to keep valuables out of sight costs extra, but there’s a smaller front boot for more luggage. The Model Y didn’t take any more cases than the Model 3 when we tested it up to where the parcel shelf would be, but its hatchback opening makes it easier to load. 

All Model Ys have an electric tailgate that can be opened and closed using the car’s touchscreen, a phone app or by pressing a button on the back of the car. 

Read our in-depth Tesla Model Y review

Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Loads of interior space for the money
  • Stylish and plush-feeling interior
  • Competitive fuel economy

Weaknesses

  • Poor rear head room with the optional sunroof fitted
  • Rivals have more diverse engine lineups
  • Slow-witted infotainment system

Boot size 952 litres | Suitcases 10

Designed with families in mind, the 5008 has plenty of boot space. In fact, it easily outdoes rivals such as the Mazda CX-5 and Skoda Kodiaq in that respect.  

It’s a seven-seater as standard, but with the two rearmost seats folded into the floor, the boot has flat sides with no wheel-arch intrusion and lots of height from the floor to the tonneau cover. Access is good, too, because the opening is low and there’s no lip to negotiate to get heavy items stowed. 

If you opt for a 5008 in a higher trim level, you get a tailgate that will open when you waggle your foot under the rear bumper – handy when you have your hands full. 

Read our in-depth Peugeot 5008 review

Our pick: 3.0 D300 SE 4dr Auto

0-62mph: 6.3 sec
MPG/range: 38.2mpg
CO2 emissions: 194g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 1093 litres
Insurance group: 50E
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Fabulous driving position
  • Fantastic off-road ability
  • Useful seven-seat versatility

Weaknesses

  • Very expensive
  • Reliability is a concern
  • More physical controls for the infotainment would be preferable

Boot size 818 litres (measured to the roof) | Suitcases 10

The latest Range Rover is bigger, pricier and more lavishly equipped than ever.  It’s available in standard length or long wheelbase (LWB) form, and the longer version can be had with seven seats – a first for a Range Rover. That third row is pretty roomy, albeit not quite as accommodating as the BMW X7’s. 

You get the same vast boot on all Range Rover models, including the LWB and plug-in hybrid. An electrically operated two-piece tailgate is standard, and the bottom section can be used as a seat when you’re parked up. There’s also the option to add a fold-up section to the boot floor that can act as either a backrest or a divider for luggage. 

Read our in-depth Range Rover review

Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Strong engines
  • Spacious inside for up to five people
  • Excellent towing capabilities

Weaknesses

  • Depreciates quicker than a BMW X5
  • Firm ride without air suspension
  • No seven-seat option

Boot size 810 litres | Suitcases 10

The Touareg shares its underpinnings with the huge Audi Q7 luxury SUV, so it’s no surprise that it has one of the largest boots in its class. Unlike the Q7, it’s not available as a seven-seater, but its second seating row slides back and forth so you can decide whether to prioritise cargo space or leg room for your passengers. The seats also split 40/20/40, making it easier to load long or awkward items into the car alongside people. 

The load area is a good, square shape, and there’s no lip to lift your luggage over. Although the boot floor isn’t too high off the ground for an SUV, you can opt for a model with air suspension that lowers the car when it’s parked. 

Read our in-depth Volkswagen Touareg review

Our pick: 2.0 B5P [250] Core 5dr AWD Geartronic

0-62mph: 7.7 sec
MPG/range: 33.6mpg
CO2 emissions: 190g/km
Seats: 7
Boot: 302 litres
Insurance group: 37E
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Classy interior
  • Seven seats come as standard
  • Plug-in hybrid option

Weaknesses

  • Road and suspension noise
  • Rivals offer a more comfortable ride
  • Fiddly infotainment system

Boot size 775 litres | Suitcases 10

Volvo’s flagship SUV is big, luxurious and practical, and comes with seven seats as  standard. The boot area is wide, with no intrusions, and it’s one of the longest in its class, so you can stow some larger items without folding down any of the three middle-row seats. Those seats slide back  and forth independently, adding to the XC90’s versatility. 

There’s no load lip to negotiate to lift heavy items into the boot, and the opening is large. With all seven seats in place, there’s enough room for only a  couple of carry-on suitcases in the boot, but there’s an underfloor stowage cubby in most models (the T8 plug-in hybrid loses this to the battery). 

Read our in-depth Volvo XC90 review

Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Smooth and powerful engines
  • Pillowy ride in Sport and S line trims
  • Superb interior quality

Weaknesses

  • Touchscreen infotainment system
  • Third-row space is better in the BMW X7
  • Entry-level Sport trim misses some important kit

Boot size 770 litres | Suitcases 10

The Q7 has long been one of the best luxury SUVs you can buy because it’s comfortable, quiet and surprisingly agile for a seven-seat SUV. 

When it’s in five-seat mode, the boot is cavernous enough to accommodate a  couple of pushchairs or other large items below the tonneau cover. There are four fastening points that can be used to stop objects from sliding around, and there’s a small storage cubby on one side. 

When the rearmost pair of seats are in use, the boot halves in size, but it can still take a couple of our suitcases and offers more room than a Land Rover Discovery.  

If you desire pace as well as space, the Audi SQ7 sports SUV version is just as roomy. 

Read our in-depth Audi Q7 review

Our pick: RWD 4dr Auto

0-62mph: 6.1 sec
CO2 emissions: 0g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 594 litres
Insurance group: 36D
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Fast and reliable charging via Tesla's Supercharger network
  • Long range between charges
  • Surprisingly practical

Weaknesses

  • Fiddly interior controls
  • Handling not as entertaining as the best petrol-powered rivals
  • Windscreen pillars hamper visibility

Boot size 649 litres (including front boot) | Suitcases 10

One of the advantages electric cars have over petrol and diesel models is that the  absence of an engine means many have a front boot under the bonnet, plus more interior space. 

Tesla’s smallest model isn’t much bigger than a BMW 3 Series, but it’s much roomier inside and has two boots, plus a big underfloor compartment in the one at the rear. Together, they give you more carrying capacity than in other executive saloons and many electric rivals, including the Hyundai Ioniq 6 and Polestar 2

On the minus side, the Model 3 is a saloon, so it doesn’t have a usefully wide hatchback boot opening. 

Read our in-depth Tesla Model 3 review

Our pick: E300e AMG Line Advanced 5dr 9G-Tronic

0-62mph: 6.5 sec
MPG/range: 470.8mpg
CO2 emissions: 14g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 460 litres
Insurance group: 50E
Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Base car is well equipped
  • E300e makes for a compelling company car

Weaknesses

  • Not cheap

Boot size 640 litres | Suitcases 10

The classy, spacious and well-equipped E-Class Estate has been a staple of luxury family motoring for more than 20 years. Its large, square boot can swallow eight carry-on cases, with room for two more in the underfloor storage compartment.  

Useful features include bag hooks and a foldable crate for smaller items. The rear seats fold 40/20/40, so long items can be carried without lowering all the seatbacks, and there are buttons in the boot and on the rear doors to fold down the seatbacks electrically. 

The performance-focused Mercedes AMG E63 Estate has the same carrying capacity, but the E300de plug-in hybrid version has a much smaller boot.

Read our in-depth Mercedes E-Class Estate review

Our pick: 1.5 TSI 150 SE L 5dr

0-62mph: 8.5 sec
MPG/range: 53.3mpg
CO2 emissions: 121g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 600 litres
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Plush interior
  • Huge boot
  • Frugal engines

Weaknesses

  • Rivals are sharper to drive
  • Touchscreen can be tricky to use on the move
  • Currently no plug-in hybrid option

Boot size 640 litres | Suitcases 10

It’s no wonder the Octavia has been Skoda’s best-selling model since it was launched in 1998: it has a smart, roomy  interior and a range of frugal engines. It doesn’t just dwarf its family hatchback rivals for boot space; it also puts larger cars to shame, and there are bag hooks and two small compartments in its boot to contain clutter.

There’s a big load lip that could make it harder to load heavy items, though, and the hatchback doesn’t have an adjustable boot floor. If this is an issue, consider the Octavia Estate, although that version actually takes one less carry-on suitcase. The plug-in hybrid iV loses some boot  space but still beats equivalent rivals. 

Read our in-depth Skoda Octavia review

Our pick: 1.6 T-GDi HEV Edition 5dr Auto

0-62mph: 9 sec
MPG/range: 38.2mpg
CO2 emissions: 168g/km
Seats: 7
Boot: 608 litres
Insurance group: 31D
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Seven seats fit for adults
  • A massive boot
  • Well equipped

Weaknesses

  • Priced above mainstream rivals
  • Hybrid engine isn't as fuel efficient as a Honda CR-V's
  • Interior quality not as good as similarly priced premium rivals

Boot size 608 litres | Suitcases 10

The Sorento is a practical load-lugger that can transport seven people in comfort. There’s hardly any boot lip to lift heavy items over and the large load area is a  useful square shape, with recesses for extra width at the back. 

A couple of carry-on suitcases will fit behind the third-row seats when they’re in use. The hybrid Sorento has a small underfloor storage compartment that can be used with the third seat row raised or lowered. The batteries for the plug-in hybrid version take up that space, so it has a little less capacity overall.  

It’s also worth noting that the rival Hyundai Santa Fe and Peugeot 5008 can carry just as many cases but cost less. 

Read our in-depth Kia Sorento review

Our pick: 1.6 TGDi Hybrid Premium 5dr Auto

0-62mph: 8.9 sec
MPG/range: 44.1mpg
CO2 emissions: 145g/km
Seats: 7
Boot: 571 litres
Insurance group: 22E
Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Outstanding seven-seat practicality
  • Plush interior
  • Long warranty

Weaknesses

  • Pricing yet to be confirmed
  • Hybrid engine not particularly inspiring
  • Styling might be divisive

Boot size 571 litres | Suitcases 10

The latest Santa Fe is our reigning Seven seater of the Year, because it has space for seven adults and a huge boot, and it’s great value for money. Even though its boot is smaller than the previous generation model’s, it still swallowed 10 of our carry-on suitcases, matching the tally of the larger Audi Q7 luxury SUV. 

With all seven seats in use, it has more room behind them than the Land Rover Discovery Sport and Peugeot 5008, and there are buttons in the boot to fold the third-row seats down electrically.  

Although there is only minimal underfloor storage space, the boot has a low loading lip and flat floor, and is equipped with a 12-volt power socket. 

Read our in-depth Hyundai Santa Fe review

Our pick: 2.0 D200 MHEV S 5dr Auto

0-62mph: 7.8 sec
MPG/range: 43.7mpg
CO2 emissions: 169g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 552 litres
Insurance group: 36E
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Very comfy with smaller wheels or air suspension
  • Cheaper versions are temptingly priced
  • Huge boot

Weaknesses

  • Rivals are more agile
  • Fiddly climate controls
  • Disappointing reliability record

Boot size 513 litres | Suitcases 10

The Velar fits neatly between Land Rover’s entry-level Range Rover Evoque and the larger Range Rover Sport in the brand’s line-up,  but it beats both for boot space. It also outdoes two key rivals – the BMW X4 and the Porsche Macan – both of which can take eight carry-on suitcases.  

The boot floor is fairly high up, but you can opt for a model with air suspension that will lower the car when it’s parked.  An electrically operated tailgate is standard, or you can add a remote opening function that works when you wave your foot under the back of the vehicle. The Velar P400e plug-in hybrid has a bit less boot space because of the battery under the floor. 

Read our in-depth Range Rover Velar review


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