Toyota Supra review

Category: Sports car

Section: Introduction

Available fuel types:petrol
Available colours:
Toyota Supra 2019 RHD front tracking shot
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  • Toyota Supra 2019 RHD front tracking shot
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  • Toyota Supra 2019 UK centre console detail
  • Toyota Supra 2019 RHD front tracking shot
  • Toyota Supra 2019 RHD rear tracking shot
  • Toyota Supra 2019 RHD dashboard
  • Toyota Supra 2019 RHD front seats
  • Toyota Supra 2019 RHD infotainment
  • Toyota Supra 2019 wide front cornering shot
  • Toyota Supra 2019 RHD panning shot
  • Toyota Supra 2019 RHD front right studio
  • Toyota Supra 2019 RHD left side studio
  • Toyota Supra 2019 RHD rear left studio
  • Toyota Supra 2019 UK centre console detail
RRP from£53,035

Introduction

What Car? says...

Like an automotive Frankenstein, Toyota seems fixated on bringing back cars from the dead. Indeed the Toyota GR Supra is the third car in the current lineup who’s name has been lifted from the bin, dusted off and glued to the back of a brand new model.

Like every generation before it, the A90 Supra (to use Toyota’s internal naming code) follows a simple recipe. Up front there’s a brawny straight-six engine that powers the rear wheels alone, although for the first time it’s a strict two seater. No manual gearbox is available, just an eight-speed automatic with standard paddle shifters should you want a bit more driver involvement.

But because profit margins on sports cars are so thin, Toyota shared the development costs of the Supra with BMW. Cast your eye over the spec sheet for the Z4 M40i and you’ll notice that it shares its 3.0-litre turbocharged straight-six, gearbox, differential and basic suspension setup.

Cast an eye over the interior and it’s even more obvious, with a lightly disguised iDrive infotainment system and lots of BMW switches, stalks and other controls. But although purists may scoff at the Supra’s German DNA, Toyota has most definitely put its own distinctive stamp on the car with unique styling and bespoke tuning for the oily bits. That’s it’s a lot lighter and stiffer than the soft-top only Z4 doesn’t hurt, either.

 

However, despite it packing an impressive 335bhp, outright performance was not the goal for the Supra. No, like the Alpine A110, the Supra has been designed to be fun above all else, even if it goes about it in a completely different way. Although it isn’t the porkiest sports car around, the Supra is still around 400kg bulkier than the A110. But the key rival Toyota has in mind is the Porsche 718 Cayman, although we’d argue the  Jaguar F-Type V6 S, with its front-engine, rear-wheel drive layout, is a more natural rival.

In this review, we'll run you through all of the Supra’s strengths and weaknesses, tell you how it compares to key rivals, and ultimately, if you should buy one. And remember, if you decide to buy a Supra, or indeed any other sports car, head over to our New Car Buying service to find out how much you could save on the brochure price.

At a glance

Number of trims2 see more
Available fuel typespetrol
MPG range across all versions34.4 - 34.4
Avaliable doors options3

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