Polestar 2 review

Category: Large Electric

Section: Costs & verdict

Polestar 2 touchscreen - 2020 car
  • Polestar 2 2021 front
  • 2021 Polestar 2 rear tracking
  • 2021 Polestar 2 RHD dashboard
  • Polestar 2 rear boot - 2020 car
  • Polestar 2 touchscreen - 2020 car
  • 2021 Polestar 2 right tracking
  • 2021 Polestar 2 rear right cornering
  • 2021 Polestar 2 rear right cornering
  • Polestar 2 door trim - 2020 car
  • Polestar 2 front boot - 2020 car
  • Polestar 2 2021 front
  • 2021 Polestar 2 rear tracking
  • 2021 Polestar 2 RHD dashboard
  • Polestar 2 rear boot - 2020 car
  • Polestar 2 touchscreen - 2020 car
  • 2021 Polestar 2 right tracking
  • 2021 Polestar 2 rear right cornering
  • 2021 Polestar 2 rear right cornering
  • Polestar 2 door trim - 2020 car
  • Polestar 2 front boot - 2020 car
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Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

The 64kWh single-motor Polestar 2 fractionally undercuts the Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus, but like the Tesla, it is too pricey to qualify for the Government’s electric car grant. Leasing rates should also be competitive throughout the range, thanks to its impressive resale values; the Polestar 2 is predicted to depreciate at a similar rate to the Model 3 and should shed value less quickly than the Audi Q4 e-tron, Mercedes EQA and Kia e-Niro.  

It’s as a company car that the Polestar 2 makes the most sense; as with its electric rivals, you'll enjoy extremely low benefit-in-kind (BIK) tax bills, at least for the next few years.

The Performance Pack we mentioned earlier is available only on the long-range dual-motor variant and includes adjustable suspension, more powerful brakes from specialist brand Brembo, forged 20in wheels and signature ‘Swedish gold’ details inside and out. 

The 64kWh battery can’t charge at quite the same rate as the 78kWh battery (up to 116kW, compared with the latter's 150kW), but because the former is a little smaller, both will go from 10-80% in just over 30 minutes at their fastest charging rates. That said, it’s more likely that you’ll come across a 50kW charger when stopping at a motorway service station, and from one of those you’ll get a 10-80% charge in around an hour.

Charging rates from a three-pin plug or a 7kW home charger have yet to be confirmed for the smaller 64kWh battery, but it will take around 12 hours to charge the 78kWh battery from 0-100% using a 7kW charger, while a standard three-pin plug charge will take more than 23 hours to trickle in. It’s worth remembering that fewer charging points are available for use by a Polestar than by a Tesla; the latter can use that company’s network of Superchargers, which are particularly easy to use, quick and increasingly commonplace.

The Polestar 2 is covered by a three-year, 60,000-mile warranty, while a Model 3 gets four years or 50,000 miles of cover – whichever elapses first. With both cars, the battery and drive unit are covered separately, which for the Polestar 2 is eight years or 100,000 miles. The Model 3's battery is covered for up to 120, 000 miles.

Overview

The Polestar 2 is a thrillingly quick electric car with an exquisite interior, decent range and competitive pricing structure. Just bear in mind that the similar-priced Tesla Model 3 is better to drive and more practical, plus it has a longer range and a better charging network.

  • Brilliant performance
  • Decent official range
  • Classy interior
  • Road noise
  • Weight compromises agility
  • Limited rear head room