Audi Q2 review

Category: Small SUV

The Q2 small SUV is not cheap, but it is good to drive and has a smart interior

Red Audi Q2 front cornering
  • Red Audi Q2 front cornering
  • Red Audi Q2 rear cornering
  • Darren Moss test driving Audi Q2
  • Audi Q2 boot open
  • Audi Q2 interior driver display
  • Red Audi Q2 right driving
  • Red Audi Q2 rear right driving
  • Red Audi Q2 rear cornering
  • Audi Q2 front interior
  • Audi Q2 interior back seats
  • Audi Q2 steering wheel detail
  • Audi Q2 infotainment touchscreen
  • Audi Q2 air-con controls
  • Audi Q2 interior detail
  • Audi Q2 interior detail
  • Audi Q2 interior detail
  • Red Audi Q2 front cornering
  • Red Audi Q2 rear cornering
  • Darren Moss test driving Audi Q2
  • Audi Q2 boot open
  • Audi Q2 interior driver display
  • Red Audi Q2 right driving
  • Red Audi Q2 rear right driving
  • Red Audi Q2 rear cornering
  • Audi Q2 front interior
  • Audi Q2 interior back seats
  • Audi Q2 steering wheel detail
  • Audi Q2 infotainment touchscreen
  • Audi Q2 air-con controls
  • Audi Q2 interior detail
  • Audi Q2 interior detail
  • Audi Q2 interior detail
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Introduction

What Car? says...

Having shown the world how successfully it could do medium and large SUVs, Audi decided to go small when it released the Audi Q2.

With its compact dimensions and a level of build quality worthy of that famous four-ringed badge, the Q2 arrived on the scene and immediately proved that small SUVs could be more than just a fashion statement. 

And half a decade later, it's still punching above its weight, proving a best-seller among Audi’s range of SUVs. One of the reasons the Q2 has remained popular is that Audi has treated it to a number of updates, introducing sharper styling and new tech, including LED headlights (with adaptive matrix LEDs available as an option).

It's good news that you get plenty of tech, because the Q2 has traditionally struggled to compete price-wise with key small SUV rivals, including the Ford Puma and VW T-Roc (as well as the larger but no more expensive Seat Ateca).

So, does the Audi Q2 still cost more to run, and if so is it worth it? Read on to find out...

Overview

The Audi Q2 is a desirable and fine-driving small SUV with an impressive interior. It also has one of the best infotainment systems in the class. Yes, there are cheaper alternatives, but Audi's smallest SUV justifies its cost with its superb all-round ability. If you buy one, we recommend the 35 TFSI petrol engine with entry-level Sport trim.

  • Classy and user-friendly interior
  • Tidy handling
  • Slow depreciation
  • Ford Puma is more fun to drive
  • Mini Countryman is more practical
  • Firm ride with 19in alloys
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Audi Q2 35 TFSI Sport 5dr review
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Performance & drive

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

Engine, 0-60mph and gearbox

The entry-level Audi Q2 gets a 1.0-litre petrol engine (30 TFSI) that offers perfectly adequate acceleration, although it can struggle a bit in hilly areas – especially when the Q2 is fully loaded with people and bags. 

The 148bhp 1.5-litre petrol (35 TFSI) is noticeably punchier and, given the Q2's premium billing, we reckon it's worth the extra. It comes with a six-speed manual gearbox as standard, but you can pay extra to have a seven-speed S tronic automatic gearbox.

There's also a performance version – to read about that, see our Audi SQ2 review.

Suspension and ride comfort

The Q2 has firmer suspension than many small SUVs, including the Peugeot 2008 and VW T-Roc. The upshot? You're jostled around in your seat a little more, particularly along pockmarked urban roads.

Things never get overly firm or jarring though, and the Q2 is actually quite smooth and composed at motorway speeds. We'd suggest steering clear of the 19in alloy wheels that come with top-spec Black Edition because they make the ride less comfy.

Red Audi Q2 rear cornering

Handling

The Q2's relatively firm suspension does a great job of propping up its body through corners, and there's hardly any more lean than in a regular hatchback. There's also plenty of grip, so this is a car you can drive quickly along a country road with real confidence.

All versions come with Audi’s progressive steering, which means the steering gets quicker the more you turn the wheel, so fewer turns are required when parking and manoeuvring. It works well, but the Ford Puma has more accurate steering and is even more fun to drive because of it.

Audi Q2 image
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Noise and vibration

The three-cylinder 30 TFSI petrol engine sounds a little thrummy when worked hard, but it's hardly boisterous and settles down at a steady cruise. You can feel a little vibration through the controls, but not an excessive amount. The four-cylinder 35 TFSI is noticeably smoother than the entry-level engine.

At motorway speeds, all versions of the Q2 cruise relatively quietly. Little wind noise enters the passenger compartment, so it’s a relaxing car to take on long journeys, although there is some road noise – particularly on models with larger alloy wheels. Overall, the T-Roc is a quieter alternative.

The six-speed manual gearbox is light and slick, and the clutch bites positively. Combined with the well-weighted brake pedal, it makes the Q2 an easy car to drive smoothly. However, the S tronic auto gearbox can be a little jerky at very low speeds.

Driving overview

Strengths Good to drive; great engines; pretty refined at motorway speeds

Weaknesses Auto gearbox can be jerky; rivals ride better; Ford Puma is even more fun to drive

Interior

The interior layout, fit and finish

Driving position and dashboard

Whatever size and shape you are, it’s unlikely you’ll have a problem with the Audi Q2’s driving position. The steering wheel has a good range of up-and-down, and in-and-out movement, and every model has powered adjustable lumbar support as standard. 

Better still, the seat supports your thighs and shoulders well, helping you stay comfortable on a long journey.

The Q2's dashboard is essentially the same as the one in the previous-generation Audi A3 but that's no bad thing. It means the buttons and switches are clearly marked and positioned within easy reach, and you get 12.3in Virtual Cockpit digital instrument dials as standard on all trims.

Visibility, parking sensors and cameras

Even though the Q2 is a relatively small car, it still gives you a decently high-up driving position that most SUV buyers seek. You're treated to a great view of the road ahead, aided by reasonably slim windscreen pillars.

The rearward view isn’t quite so good, because wide rear pillars obscure over-the-shoulder visibility. Rear parking sensors come as standard, but you have to either pay extra if you want front parking sensors and a rear-view camera.

All versions come with powerful LED headlights, while Black Edition models come with adaptive matrix versions, which can be left on main beam without dazzling other drivers.

Darren Moss test driving Audi Q2

Sat nav and infotainment

The Q2 has one of the best infotainment systems of any small SUV. Its 8.8in touchscreen can be controlled using a rotary controller between the front seats and shortcut buttons by the gear lever – a much less distracting control method than prodding the screen. 

The system includes all the essentials, including DAB radio, Bluetooth, Android Auto and Apple Carplay smartphone mirroring, and a USB socket for charging your phone. You also get built-in sat-nav no matter which version you go for, with online map updates (free for five years), Google Earth navigation, live traffic information, online media streaming and a wifi hotspot for up to eight mobile devices.

The standard stereo will be good enough for most, but you can option a technology pack that adds an upgraded Sonos sound system and wireless phone-charging.

Quality

Audi has a fine track record of creating beautifully built interiors and the Q2 is another cracking effort. It puts most other small SUVs, including the VW T-Roc and Peugeot 2008, to shame for quality.

The upper surfaces of the dashboard feel soft to the touch, while all the switches and buttons operate with a precise click. The rotary climate control buttons, for example, tick satisfyingly when you rotate them. 

You can personalise your Q2 with a number of interior trim combinations. You can also add more interior ambience, with the optional LED interior lighting pack, which gets illuminated inlays, which glow in a number of different colours.

Interior overview

Strengths Great driving position; brilliant build quality; decent infotainment system

Weaknesses Rear visibility could be better

Passenger & boot space

How it copes with people and clutter

Front space

Even if you're a bit of a giant, front space shouldn’t be a problem. There’s plenty of head and leg room, and the interior isn't narrow enough to make you feel like you’re shoulder-to-shoulder with your front passenger.

In addition, there's a decent-sized glovebox and door bins that are large enough to hold a one-litre bottle of drink. You also get two cupholders in front of the gearlever.

Rear space

There's enough space in the back of the Q2 for a couple of six-footers. It's broadly similar space-wise to the Peugeot 2008 and VW T-Roc but the Mini Countryman trumps it comprehensively, and is a better choice if you carry three people in the back regularly.

Rear passengers each get a door bin that can swallow a small bottle of water, plus there's a folding centre armrest complete with two integrated cupholders.

Audi Q2 boot open

Seat folding and flexibility

The Q2 comes with 60/40 split-folding rear seats as standard, and the backrests are easy to drop using levers by each rear headrest. However, if you want to carry skis or anything else long, with three people in the car, consider the Countryman or the T-Roc (they get 40/20/40 split rear seats).

Unlike in some rivals – including the cheaper VW T-Cross – there’s no sliding rear seat option for the Q2.

Boot space

The Q2 has a 405-litre boot (marginally bigger than an Audi A3 Sportback boot) and it's usefully square in shape. There’s room for six carry-on suitcases or a folded pram below the parcel shelf. That said, some small SUVs, including the Countryman, offer even more luggage space.

You also get a height-adjustable boot floor. In its highest position, the floor is flush with the leading edge of the boot opening, so there’s no load lip. There's also an agreeably flat extended load deck when you fold down the rear seats.

Practicality overview

Strengths Loads of front space; usefully shaped boot

Weaknesses Rivals have more rear space; rival boots are even bigger

Buying & owning

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2

The Audi Q2 is a little pricier than the Ford Puma and Peugeot 2008, but costs around the same to buy outright as a VW T-Roc. Luckily, its sharp looks and premium badge will have people queuing up to buy when you decide to sell on in the future, and it’s predicted to hold its value just as well as those rivals. 

Monthly PCP finance costs are not as steep as you might expect, either. To make sure you get the best price, see our new Audi deals page.

The Q2's CO2 emissions are not particularly low, so in terms of BIK tax payments an equivalent Peugeot 2008 will cost less to run as a company car. Both Q2 engines are relatively frugal, the entry-level 30 TFSI will get you the most miles to the gallon.

Equipment, options and extras

Entry-level Sport trim is very well equipped, with highlights including 17in alloys, LED headlights, air-con and cruise control, as well as an 8.8in infotainment system with smartphone mirroring. It’s the trim we’d go for. 

S Line trim is next in the ladder, adding bigger wheels, sports suspension, sportier S Line styling, sports seats and privacy glass. 

Top-spec Black Edition is the one to go for if you want all the toys, adding yet larger wheels, special styling and matrix LED headlights.

Audi Q2 interior driver display

Reliability

The Q2 performed well in the 2023 What Car? Reliability Survey, finishing fourth in the small SUV class, ahead of the Mini Countryman, VW T-Cross and VW T-Roc.

It was one of the most dependable Audis ranked, and Audi finished a slightly disappointing 26th out of 32 car makers in the manufacturer reliability table.

You get a comprehensive three-year, 60,000-mile manufacturer’s warranty, which includes breakdown cover. You can extend it for a reasonable cost for up to five years or 90,000 miles.

Safety and security

All Q2s come with six airbags, three Isofix child-seat mounting points (one in the front and two in the back), and automatic emergency braking (AEB).

Other standard kit includes hill-hold assist, traffic-sign recognition and lane-departure warning. You can no longer get blind-spot monitoring or rear cross-traffic alert because they were part of the discontinued Vorsprung trim. 

The Q2 was awarded five stars out of five for safety by Euro NCAP with no major weaknesses identified, although that was back in 2016 and the rating has since expired.

Costs overview

Strengths Slow predicted depreciation; lots of standard kit; good reliability rating; 

Weaknesses Could do with more safety kit


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FAQs

  • Yes, in fact it’s the smallest SUV in the Audi range. It measures in at around the same size as the VW T-Roc.

  • You can have the regular Audi Q2 in three different trims levels – Sport, S Line and Black Edition. You can also choose from two different engines, the 30 TFSI and the 35 TFSI. There's also a performance version – to read about that, see our Audi SQ2 review.

At a glance
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RRP price range £29,105 - £49,740
Number of trims (see all)5
Number of engines (see all)4
Available fuel types (which is best for you?)petrol
MPG range across all versions 32.8 - 48.7
Available doors options 5
Warranty 3 years / 60000 miles
Company car tax at 20% (min/max) £1,727 / £3,555
Company car tax at 40% (min/max) £3,454 / £7,109
Available colours