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BMW X1 vs Mazda CX-5 vs Volkswagen Tiguan

The all-new VW Tiguan is bigger, classier and better equipped than the original. But is it better than BMW's X1 and Mazda's CX-5?

Words By What Car? team

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BMW X1 side

What will they cost?

The Mazda CX-5 will appeal if you’re buying on PCP finance. Put down a Β£5000 deposit and you’ll pay Β£330 a month for the next three years, whereas the BMW X1 and Volkswagen Tiguan will cost Β£364 and Β£393 respectively. All these deals limit you to 45,000 miles during that time and you’ll need to stump up a hefty β€˜balloon’ payment at the end if you want to keep the car.

If you’re paying cash upfront, there’s barely anything to split our trio for three-year ownership costs. The CX-5 is cheapest to buy, but will be worth the least when you sell on, while the Tiguan will cost you the most to start with but will lose the least of all in depreciation. Meanwhile, the X1 is cheapest to tax and service, but pricier to insure.

We weren’t able to put the Tiguan through our real-world True MPG fuel tests, but based on official figures it’s the thirstiest here. The X1 and CX-5 both just managed to top 47.0mpg in our True MPG tests.

Official figures are all that counts when it comes to CO2 emissions, so the X1 is the cheapest company car. A 40% rate taxpayer will pay nearly Β£500 more in benefit-in-kind (BIK) tax to drive the CX-5 for three years, and a further Β£1120 for the Tiguan.

All three SUVs come with climate control, automatic lights and wipers, rear parking sensors and sat-nav, but the CX-5 adds heated leather seats and an electric sunroof. Only BMW charges extra for cruise control, front parking sensors and automatic emergency braking, but the X1 is the only one with a powered tailgate – a boon when you’re staggering towards the car with armfuls of shopping.

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