How to spec a Toyota C-HR

Our guide covers what specification to go for on Toyota's small SUV, as well as the options to buy and how much you should pay...

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Darren Moss
8 May 2017 10:40 | Last updated: 14 Jun 2018 00:03

Our Toyota C-HR review is consistently one of the most read on whatcar.com, and the car itself is starting to become a popular sight on UK roads.

In terms of size, the C-HR faces off against some of our favourite small SUVs, including the Nissan Qashqai and Seat Ateca, but it costs a bit more to buy.

Our full review can take you through which of the C-HR's two engine options will suit you best, and also what it's like inside, but here we're going to look at what each specification gets you, and whether it's worth spending money on any options.


Which Toyota C-HR specification should I choose?

There are three specifications to choose from with the C-HR, dubbed Icon, Excel and Dynamic. Below, we've listed the highlights of what each version gets you.

Toyota C-HR Icon specification

  • 17in alloy wheels
  • Automatic wipers
  • Black fabric seats
  • Dual-zone climate control
  • 4.2in driver's information screen
  • 8.0in touchscreen infotainment system
  • Reversing camera
  • Toyota Safety Sense (including automatic emergency braking, adaptive cruise control and lane departure warning)

Toyota C-HR Excel specification (in addition to Icon models)

  • 18in alloy wheels
  • Tinted privacy glass
  • Heated front seats
  • Satellite navigation
  • Front and rear parking sensors
  • Keyless entry and start
  • Blind spot monitoring system
  • Rear cross traffic alert
  • Ambient interior lighting

Toyota C-HR Dynamic specification (in addition to Excel models)

  • Front and rear LED lighting
  • Auto folding, heated door mirrors
  • Two-tone roof

How to spec a Toyota C-HR

Which specification should I go for on the Toyota C-HR?

There's really no reason to look beyond the entry-level Icon model, because it comes with everything you'd expect from a modern small SUV – as well as plenty of things you wouldn't, including adaptive cruise control. The posher trims get you more luxury, but they also cost more to buy. To keep costs sensible, we'd stick with Icon.

How to spec a Toyota C-HR

Toyota C-HR options

Options we'd recommend

SUVs are popular vehicles for towing, and while the lack of a diesel engine in the C-HR limits its appeal in this regard, a detachable tow bar is available with either a seven or 13-pin wiring kit. If you've got a trailer or caravan that you'd like to take with you, then it's worth looking at.

Options to consider

If you want to add an extra dash of colour to your C-HR, then the Accents pack is reasonably priced, and allows you to choose from six different colours which can be used on pieces of exterior trim, such as around the front and rear bumpers.

Keeping children entertained on long journeys can be difficult, but the C-HR's rear entertainment pack comes with docking stations which can be used for either a 7.0in DVD player, or as a holder for an iPad.

Full leather seats are also worth considering if you want a bit more comfort.

Options to avoid

Styling packs can sometimes go too far, and while the C-HR's SUV pack gives the car the appearance of a more aggressive off-roader with a new front and rear guard and side skirts, it costs a lot to buy for relatively little gain.

How to spec a Toyota C-HR

Toyota C-HR price

At the time of writing, our favourite C-HR 1.2T Icon with a six-speed manual gearbox costs £21,065, and we wouldn't recommend adding any options unless you're in need of a towbar.

Model: Toyota C-HR 1.2T Icon Manual

OTR Price: £21,065

Target Price: £18,956

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How to spec a Toyota C-HR

How to haggle on a Toyota C-HR

The Toyota C-HR's popularity, and the fact that it's a very new model, means that discounts so far are rare. Time should open up more discounts, and in the meantime PCP rates are competitive, with our recommended 1.2T Icon model can currently be picked up for less than £300 per month.

Next: read the full Toyota C-HR review