Nissan Leaf review

Category: Electric car

Section: Costs & verdict

Nissan Leaf interior infotainment
  • Nissan Leaf front left tracking
  • Nissan Leaf rear cornering
  • Nissan Leaf interior dashboard
  • Nissan Leaf interior front seats
  • Nissan Leaf interior infotainment
  • Nissan Leaf right tracking
  • Nissan Leaf front tracking
  • Nissan Leaf rear left tracking
  • Nissan Leaf cornering
  • Nissan Leaf front left static
  • Nissan Leaf rear left static
  • Nissan Leaf left static
  • Nissan Leaf wheel detail
  • Nissan Leaf rear lights detail
  • Nissan Leaf badge detail
  • Nissan Leaf interior steering wheel detail
  • Nissan Leaf front left tracking
  • Nissan Leaf rear cornering
  • Nissan Leaf interior dashboard
  • Nissan Leaf interior front seats
  • Nissan Leaf interior infotainment
  • Nissan Leaf right tracking
  • Nissan Leaf front tracking
  • Nissan Leaf rear left tracking
  • Nissan Leaf cornering
  • Nissan Leaf front left static
  • Nissan Leaf rear left static
  • Nissan Leaf left static
  • Nissan Leaf wheel detail
  • Nissan Leaf rear lights detail
  • Nissan Leaf badge detail
  • Nissan Leaf interior steering wheel detail
What Car?’s Leaf deals
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In this section:
  • Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2
  • Equipment, options and extras
  • Reliability
  • Safety and security

Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2

The 39kWh version of the Nissan Leaf is one of the most affordable electric cars on sale, competing with the likes of the MG4 and MG ZS EV plus entry-level versions of the Renault Zoe. Jumping up to the 59kWh e+ models hikes up the price considerably, so the car costs a similar amount to the Cupra Born, Kia Niro EV and VW ID.3.

If you're a company car driver, you'll be on to a winner: all electric cars have ultra-low company car tax rates, at least for the next few years. 

It's worth considering an upgrade to N-Connecta trim, which adds part-faux leather, heated front and rear seats, a heated steering wheel, privacy glass, power-folding door mirrors and an auto-dimming rear-view mirror.

Tekna is too pricey to recommend, although it does add part-leather seats and a driver assistance system called Pro Pilot. That can take care of the steering in certain situations (such as when driving along a motorway) while keeping you a set distance from the car in front with adaptive cruise control.

Nissan Leaf interior infotainment

Reliability

Nissan as a brand did badly in the 2022 What Car? Reliability Survey finishing near the bottom of the league table in 25th place out of 32 manufacturers. Peugeot did worse, but MG, Renault, Skoda and Tesla all did better.

Overview

The entry-level 39kWh Leaf still makes sense if you’re on a budget because it is a fairly large EV that’s reasonable to drive, well equipped, and easy to live with. Beyond that, pricer trims and especially the 59kWh e+ models have fallen behind newer and more accomplished rivals.

  • 39kWh model is quite comfy
  • Lots of standard kit
  • Big boot
  • Rear headroom is tight
  • Flawed driving position
  • Risk of injuries in a crash
New car deals
Save up to £4,055
Target Price from £25,180
Save up to £4,055
or from £250pm
Swipe to see used and leasing deals
Nearly new deals
From £22,109
Leasing deals
From £333pm