Nissan Leaf review

Category: Electric car

Section: Interior

Nissan Leaf 2019 RHD dashboard
  • Nissan Leaf 2020 review
  • Nissan Leaf 2020 rear cornering
  • Nissan Leaf 2019 RHD dashboard
  • Nissan Leaf 2019 rear seats
  • Nissan Leaf 2019 RHD infotainment
  • Nissan Leaf 2020 side
  • Nissan Leaf 2020 instrument panel
  • Nissan Leaf 2020 gear selector
  • Nissan Leaf 2020 front seats
  • Nissan Leaf 2020 boot
  • Nissan Leaf 2020 charging socket
  • Nissan Leaf 2020 review
  • Nissan Leaf 2020 rear cornering
  • Nissan Leaf 2019 RHD dashboard
  • Nissan Leaf 2019 rear seats
  • Nissan Leaf 2019 RHD infotainment
  • Nissan Leaf 2020 side
  • Nissan Leaf 2020 instrument panel
  • Nissan Leaf 2020 gear selector
  • Nissan Leaf 2020 front seats
  • Nissan Leaf 2020 boot
  • Nissan Leaf 2020 charging socket
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In this section:
  • Driving position and dashboard
  • Visibility, parking sensors and cameras
  • Sat nav and infotainment
  • Quality

Interior

The interior layout, fit and finish

Driving position and dashboard

You sit quite high up in the Leaf, almost as if you were driving an MPV. You’ll either like that or you won’t, but the fact that the steering wheel moves only up and down only (not in and out) is a big issue; it means there’s a good chance that you'll be forced to sit closer to, or farther away from, the wheel than you’d ideally like. It's a far cry from the Mini Electric's comfortable and infinitely tuneable driving position.

The dashboard is mostly user-friendly, and there are simple, physical buttons to operate all the major controls, rather than the silly touch-sensitive interfaces you'll find in some rivals, including the VW ID.3.

Nissan Leaf 2019 RHD dashboard

Sat nav and infotainment

Every Leaf comes with an 8.0in touchscreen that’s reasonably simple to use, thanks to its logical operating system. Being a touchscreen, it's not as easy to use while you're driving as the BMW i3's or Mini's iDrive rotary controller, but the physical shortcut buttons that flank the display make it easy to hop between functions. We’re also grateful that Nissan hasn’t bowed to the latest trend and swapped the volume knob for a fiddly touch-sensitive pad.

The resolution of the touchscreen is disappointing, though. It is nowhere near as sharp as the Kia e-Niro's, and it can be tricky to see in bright, sunny conditions.