Cheapest electric cars: UK's most affordable EVs

Think all electric cars are expensive? Well, these models prove otherwise – especially after you've factored in the discounts available through our free New Car Deals service...

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by
George Hill
Published05 January 2024

Electric cars are not known for their low purchase cost yet, because they're still relatively new to our roads. However, as more cars are launched and the years go by, this is slowly starting to change. 

Manufacturers are beginning to expand their horizons by producing body styles to suit the needs (and wallets) of a wider variety of buyers. This means there are now many more cars to choose from, including different sizes of electric car and electric SUV.

Some models have been on the market for several years now too, which means that there are some great discounts available. On top of that, the recently introduced ZEV Mandate is only going to enhance this.

MG4 with Target Price logo

So, which are the cheapest electric cars on sale? Here, we name the 16 cheapest cars and show you how much you can save on each of them by using our Target Price deals and our free New Car Deals service.

You can follow the links below to read our full review of each model and see our latest deals. In each case, you can also see the most up-to-date prices.

Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Surprisingly spacious for two
  • Low purchase and running costs
  • Zippy city acceleration

Weaknesses

  • Limited range
  • 28mph top speed
  • Safety concerns

Version Ami | List price £8095 | Target Price £8095

The cheapest electric car you can currently buy is the Citroën Ami. And while the Ami is technically more of a quadricycle than a full-blown car, it's a vehicle that you could use everyday for a short urban commute. Indeed, that's the only scenario where we would recommend you use the Ami, because its top speed is limited to 28mph and the official range is 46 miles. In any other situation, it can feel unsafe to drive.

Read our in-depth Citroën Ami review

Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Pleasant interior with showroom appeal
  • Comfortable ride around town
  • Plenty of interior space

Weaknesses

  • Slower charging than rivals
  • Wobblier than rivals on undulating roads
  • Brake feel takes some getting used to

Version Active | List price £26,195 | Target Price £26,195

Chinese car company BYD has recently launched the Dolphin small electric car. Despite being well priced and spacious, it isn't especially good to drive, with wallowy handling and a firm ride. On the plus side, it is well equipped; this entry-level Active model comes with a 360-degree parking camera, vehicle-to-load charging (so you can run appliances with the car’s battery) and electrically-adjustable front seats.

Read our in-depth BYD Dolphin review

Our pick: 125kW SE EV 51kWh 5dr Auto

0-62mph: 7.7 sec
CO2 emissions: 0g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 289 litres
Insurance group: 27D
Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Incredibly well priced
  • Competitive range between charges
  • Long warranty

Weaknesses

  • Some interior materials disappoint
  • Slightly unsettled ride
  • Infotainment system is fiddly

Version Standard Range SE | List price £26,995 | Target Price £26,330

The MG4 was a bit of a game-changer in the electric car world when it was first launched, and that's because it undercut nearly all of its rivals on price. This entry-level version, for example, undercuts the equivalent Volkswagen ID 3 by almost £10,000. For the money, you're also getting a car that's decent to drive and comfortable. However, it does feel cheap in places.

Read our in-depth MG4 review

Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Decent range between charges
  • Fun to drive around town
  • Stacks up well financially

Weaknesses

  • Tiny rear seats
  • Noisy on the motorway
  • Rivals have longer electric ranges

Version 24kWh 500 | List price £28,195 | Target Price £24,100

The Fiat 500 is a funky little electric car, and it's also one of the cheapest if you go for this entry-level 24kWh version. That value does come at a price: a short official range of just 115 miles. However, if you live in an urban area that shouldn't be a problem. In fact, the 500 is arguably most at home in the city, because its small dimensions, pokey performance and tidy handling make it brilliant for nipping in and out of traffic.

Read our in-depth Fiat 500 review

Our pick: 110kW Acenta 39kWh 5dr Auto

0-62mph: 7.9 sec
CO2 emissions: 0g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 435 litres
Insurance group: 24E
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • 39kWh model is quite comfy
  • Lots of standard kit
  • Big boot

Weaknesses

  • Rear headroom is tight
  • Flawed driving position
  • Risk of injuries in a crash

Version 40kWh Shiro | List price £28,495 | Target Price £24,970

The Nissan Leaf is reasonable to drive, well equipped and pretty easy to live with – but falling behind much newer rivals. Many can go farther on a full charge and are plusher and better to drive. But if you're on a budget, the standard 40kWh Leaf still makes some sense. This Shiro version is well equipped, too, and includes heated front and rear seats as standard.

Read our in-depth Nissan Leaf review

Our pick: 100kW Techno R135 50kWh 5dr Auto

0-62mph: 9.5 sec
CO2 emissions: 0g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 338 litres
Insurance group: 18E
Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Longer range than most rivals
  • Smart interior
  • Relatively big boot

Weaknesses

  • Rear head room could be better
  • Terrible safety rating
  • CCS charging costs extra on some versions

Version R135 Techno | List price £29,995 | Target Price £27,291

The Renault Zoe is great value, fairly practical and has a competitive official range of 239 miles with the R135 version. Its flawed driving position, terrible safety rating and less comfortable ride make the Peugeot e-208 a better overall buy, though – but that's assuming you can live with the e-208's shorter range. It's worth noting that Renault has recently ended production of the Zoe. However, plenty of new models should be available from dealer stock.

Read our in-depth Renault Zoe review

Our pick: 1.5 VTi-TECH Excite 5dr

0-62mph: 10.9 sec
MPG/range: 42.7mpg
CO2 emissions: 149g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 448 litres
Insurance group: 15E
Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • More practical than similarly priced electric cars
  • Long Range version has an impressive range
  • Cheaper than rival electric SUVs

Weaknesses

  • Mediocre to drive
  • Not the quietest cruiser
  • Many electric cars can charge up quicker

Version SE EV | List price £30,495 | Target Price £28,517

Like the idea of an electric car with a high-driving position? Well, the MG ZS EV could be a good option if you're on a budget, because it's the cheapest electric SUV you can currently buy. Despite it's keen pricing, the ZS EV is a commendable offering; the interior is smart for the money and you get a good amount of kit as standard with SE trim. The official range of 198 miles with this entry-level car could be better, though. 

Read our in-depth MG ZS EV review

Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Relatively good electric range
  • Low cash price
  • Sprightly performance and comfy

Weaknesses

  • Infotainment system could be easier to use
  • Rivals can charge up a little quicker
  • Not much fun to drive

Version SE | List price £30,995 | Target Price £30,077

If you're looking for an electric estate car, you aren't exactly spoilt for choice. However, the MG5 is one of the few, and it's certainly much cheaper than the Peugeot e-308 SW, Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo and Taycan Sport Turismo. Even at the lower end of the spectrum, the MG5 is comfortable, quiet and spacious, and a good choice if you're looking for a practical electric family car.

Read our in-depth MG5 review

Our pick: 125kW R-EV Prime Line 5dr Auto

0-62mph: 9.1 sec
MPG/range: 282.5mpg
CO2 emissions: 21g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 350 litres
Insurance group: 22E
Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Good ride and handling balance
  • Great infotainment system
  • Smart interior

Weaknesses

  • Poor rear-seat space
  • Limited rear visibility
  • Average resale values

Version Prime Line | List price £31,250 | Target Price £29,768

The Mazda MX-30 is a relatively affordable and well-equipped electric SUV with a smart interior. Even the entry-level Prime Line comes with a head-up display, power-folding door mirrors and automatic wipers. However, its official range of just 124 miles trails a long way behind many rivals. So, for that reason, we'd steer you towards the MX-30 R-EV hybrid instead if you're not fully set on an electric car.

Read our in-depth Mazda MX-30 review

Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Classy interior
  • Decent to drive
  • Well equipped

Weaknesses

  • Expensive
  • Cramped in the back
  • Driving position won’t suit everyone

Version Active | List price £31,200 | Target Price £31,200

The Peugeot e-208 is stylish, smart inside and decent to drive. It's also the cheapest electric car Peugeot offers (it's a fair bit cheaper than its slightly larger e-2008 sibling, plus it has a longer range). The entry-level Active comes with LED headlights, a digital driver's display and a 10in infotainment screen.

Read our in-depth Peugeot e-208 review

Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Great level of safety
  • Good rear seat space
  • Long warranty

Weaknesses

  • Tiny boot
  • Poor infotainment system
  • Many rivals ride and handle better

Version First Edition | List price £31,995 | Target Price £31,995

It may be competitively priced and well equipped, but the Ora Funky Cat is flawed in areas such as range, practicality and driving manners. If you're looking for a well-rounded but affordable electric car, we'd recommend you look at the MG4 or Peugeot e-208 instead.

Read our in-depth Ora Funky Cat review

Our pick: 1.2 PureTech [130] Plus 5dr

0-62mph: 8.9 sec
MPG/range: 54.7mpg
CO2 emissions: 122g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 380 litres
Insurance group: 19E
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Mainly cushy ride
  • Good quality interior
  • Hushed at motorway speeds

Weaknesses

  • Relatively slow acceleration
  • Not as roomy as some rivals
  • Competent handling but not particularly fun to drive

Version You | List price £32,195 | Target Price £30,547

If you're in the market for a stylish-looking coupé SUV – and also quite fancy an electric car – the Citroën e-C4 could be an ideal option. It’s practical (despite its swooping roofline), smart inside and comfortable. The entry-level You comes reasonably well equipped with dual-zone climate control, tinted rear windows and plenty of safety equipment as standard.

Read our in-depth Citroën e-C4 review

Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Comfortable ride on the whole
  • Best quality Citroën interior yet
  • Large boot

Weaknesses

  • Range could be better
  • Tight rear head room
  • So-so performance

Version You | List price £32,195 | Target Price £30,940

You may think you're seeing double, because the Citroën e-C4 X looks very similar to the Citroën e-C4. Indeed, the two cars are very closely related, although the e-C4 X is the more practical alternative thanks to its slightly bigger boot. Like its sibling, it's peaceful to drive and comfortable, plus it comes with a similar amount of kit as standard. 

Read our in-depth Citroën e-C4 X review

Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Great practicality
  • Performance rivals the regular petrol Berlingo
  • Lots of standard safety kit

Weaknesses

  • Fiddly infotainment system
  • Some storage solutions are optional
  • Could use some more range

Version Feel | List price £32,225 | Target Price £30,733

The Citroën e-Berlingo's van origins brings more benefits than you might think. Being electric, it’s more peaceful to drive than the petrol and diesel versions, plus few cars can beat it for practicality. However, it's worth noting that the interior isn't exactly plush with its hard, scratchy materials. Feel trim does at least come with a decent amount of kit, including automatic lights and wipers, an 8.0in infotainment system and rear parking sensors.

Read our in-depth Citroën e-Berlingo review

Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Relatively well priced
  • Respectable charging speeds
  • Plenty of standard kit

Weaknesses

  • Disappointing Euro NCAP safety rating
  • Rivals are nicer to drive
  • Reliability could be better

Version Design | List price £32,445 | Target Price £30,556

The Corsa Electric is Vauxhall's cheapest electric car and a fine offering. The entry-level Design comes with a good level of standard equipment, including Apple CarPlay and Android Auto phone mirroring, lane departure warning and rear parking sensors. The official range of 246 miles is also competitive with the Peugeot e-208 (248 miles) and Renault Zoe (239 miles), but not the MG4 Long Range (281 miles).

Read our in-depth Vauxhall Corsa Electric review

Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Nippy acceleration
  • High quality interior
  • Surprisingly well priced

Weaknesses

  • Limited range between charges
  • Firm ride
  • Tight on rear and boot space

Version Level 2 | List price £32,550 | Target Price £30,601

The Mini Electric is a compelling package; it's well priced, great to drive and very smart inside. However, if range is a top priority, you'll want to look elsewhere, because officially it can cover only 145 miles between top-ups. Or, if you're happy to wait, there's a new version of the Mini Electric just around the corner (called the Mini Cooper E) with an official range of 188 miles.

Read our in-depth Mini Electric review

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