Citroen Relay review

Category: Large Van

Section: Interior

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Citroen Relay interior
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Interior

The interior layout, fit and finish

If you are familiar with either of Citroen’s two other vans, the Citroen Berlingo and the Citroen Dispatch, you will immediately see that the Relay is the odd one out.

As a result of its age, it feels like it is from a different era, as the interior is quite bare and short on the sophistication of its smaller siblings, both of which are are based on the passenger car derived EMP2 platform. The Relay is a functional van, and a bit bland.

Entry-level X models are about as basic as a van gets these days, the list of nicities only extending to electric windows, heated electric mirrors, a DAB radio with Bluetooth and steering mounted controls. You’ll find other items listed in the brochure too, including a rake and reach adjustable steering wheel and 12v power socket, but they’re hardly anything to rave about.

Next comes the Worker model, which is geared more towards a vehicle that might need to venture off smooth roads occasionally. It’s not an off-road model by any means but it does get all-weather tyres, reinforced suspension and an underbody protection plate, plus Hill Descent Assist. Inside, a lower central glovebox replaces cup holders in the central area while, most noticeable of all, there’s a 5-inch colour touchscreen for the infotainment system. There's also lumbar support and an armrest for the driver’s seat, which transforms it into a being a nice place to spend long periods.

Enterprise is a more luxurious version of X, adding air-conditioning, cruise control and a speed limiter, as well as rear parking sensors. It also gets the 5-inch colour touchscreen with satellite-navigation added, plus an alarm. 

The final trim available is Driver, which enhances Enterprise specification with a rear-parking camera, automatic wipers and lights and a Driver Assist Pack, which includes new safety features like Lane Departure Warning, speed sign recognition, collision alert and Active Safety Brake. On the outside, Driver models also get the LED headlights integrated into the main headlamp unit.

Driver is without a doubt the best of the packages, but we believe that most buyers would find an Enterprise model suited their needs. In contrast, X models are really only suited for rental or fleets that work the vans hard and change them quickly.

Whichever trim you chose, the interior does feel dated when compared to others in the sector, and there are certain controls and switches which don’t feel like they are made of the best quality plastics. The handbrake, located on the right-hand side of the driver's seat, eventually proves tiresome and has the annoying habit of getting caught occasionally on a trouser leg as you leave the van. As a result, you often see them bent outwards slightly after they’ve completed a few miles.

The one strong point, however, is the Relay’s storage space, especially if the central lower glovebox (available as an option if not part of the trim level) is specified. You also get a moderately sized but lockable glovebox and decent door pockets suitable for large bottles.

Citroen Relay interior

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