BMW iX2 review

Category: Electric car

The iX2 electric SUV offers decent family practicality and strong performance

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  • Lawrence Cheung test driving BMW iX2
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  • Red BMW iX2 front right driving
  • Lawrence Cheung test driving BMW iX2
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  • BMW iX2 interior driver display
  • Red BMW iX2 right driving
  • Red BMW iX2 front driving
  • Red BMW iX2 front right driving
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  • BMW iX2 interior front seats detail
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  • BMW iX2 interior steering wheel detail
  • BMW iX2 interior infotainment
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Introduction

What Car? says...

It's been suggested that the human attention span is in decline, and if that's true we reckon the BMW iX2 could be helpful in reversing the trend.

We’re referring, of course, to the iX2's attention-grabbing styling. With its chunky SUV body, sleek coupé-like roof and a front grille that resembles big flared nostrils, it has looks that should make people stop to inspect the details.

Whether they’ll like it or not is another matter, but it’ll get owners noticed more than if they were in the closely related – but rather boxier – BMW iX1

With only one battery size and trim level, the only thing you need to decide is how powerful you want your iX2 to be. (If you're not ready for an electric car yet, you'll want the petrol version – for that see our BMW X2 review.)

Read on to find out how well the BMW iX2 stacks up against the best electric SUVs with sleek styling, including the Audi Q4 Sportback e-tron, Skoda Enyaq Coupé and Volvo C40.

Red BMW iX2 rear cornering

Performance & drive

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

The BMW iX2 is offered with a choice of two power outputs. The entry-level eDrive20 produces 201bhp, which is sent to the front wheels and can propel the car from 0-62mph in 8.6 seconds.

Or if you fancy more punch and four-wheel drive, the xDrive30 develops 308bhp and trims the 0-62mph time to 5.6 seconds. So far, this is the only version we've tried and acceleration is seriously punchy.

Whichever iX2 you choose it'll have a 64.8kWh (usable capacity) battery. The lighter eDrive20 has an official range of up to 283 miles, although the xDrive30 isn't far behind, officially managing 267 miles.

Both trail the Volvo C40 (294 miles), while the Audi Q4 Sportback e-tron 45 is even better, with an official range of around 330 miles.

So, the iX2 doesn't have a particularly great range, but on the plus side you'll be thankful of every charging stop between it'll give you a break from the uncomfortable ride. Things are particularly bad around town, where potholes and speed bumps are particularly jarring. Things are much better on the motorway, but the iX2 still isn't as smooth as a C40 or Q4 e-tron.

The upside is that the iX2 feels more agile when cornering down a country road, with impressive grip levels and minimal body lean. The steering doesn't give you a particularly great sense of connection with the front wheels, but it's accurate and allows you to place the car confidently enough during quick cornering.

BMW iX2 image
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As with most electric cars, regenerative braking is on hand to harvest energy as the car slows. You can adjust the strength of the regen effect, and there's also an adaptive mode that changes the strength of the slowing effect depending on the road layout and traffic conditions.

For a bit more theatre, you can switch to Sport or Expressive driving mode, which brings an augmented sound piped in through the speakers. The tone changes as you accelerate, and you can turn it off if you want a quieter journey. That said, the iX2 isn't the quietest motorway cruiser, with noticeably more wind noise than in a Q4 e-tron.

Driving overview

Strengths Fairly agile; xDrive30 offers punchy acceleration

Weaknesses Firm ride; some road noise; steering isn't especially feelsome

Lawrence Cheung test driving BMW iX2

Interior

The interior layout, fit and finish

The driving position is fundamentally sound in the BMW iX2, with lots of steering wheel and seat adjustment. Electric seat adjustment is available as an option, and adding this also brings adjustable lumbar support – something that really should be standard on a car costing this much money.

On the plus side, the standard sports seats do have plenty of side support to hold you in place when cornering.

You don’t get a truly commanding view of the road, but forward visibility is pretty good, helped by relatively thin windscreen pillars.

However, in a similar way to the Audi Q4 Sportback e-tron and Volvo C40, the iX2 has small side windows, a narrow rear screen and chunky rear pillars, all of which compromise visibility when you look back over your shoulder and out to the rear.

Standard-fit front and rear parking sensors and a rear-view camera help out when parking, though, and a 360-degree camera is available as an option.

A 10.3in digital instrument panel behind the steering wheel displays lots of useful information and offers a range of layouts for the driver, plus there's a 10.7in touchscreen in the centre of the dashboard.

The touchscreen is used to access many of the iX2's functions, including the climate control system, which is more fiddly than using the physical climate controls in a Q4 Sportback. At least you can adjust the stereo volume and select your drive modes using physical controls on the centre console.

The iX2’s infotainment operating system is packed full of features, including sat-nav, Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, plus apps that allow you to play arcade games and even stream videos. 

The touchscreen responds quickly to inputs and a row of touch-sensitive shortcut keys down the side of the screen takes you to the most fundamental functions directly. Meanwhile, the graphics are sharper than those in the C40 and the icons are slightly larger and easier to aim for while driving.

You're unlikely to be disappointed by the iX2's interior, but neither is it as plush as a C40's with more hard plastics on show. The iX2 has a greater prevalence of plush materials inside than a VW ID 5 though.

Interior overview

Strengths Good fundamental driving position; infotainment system is quick to respond and packed with features

Weaknesses Rear visibility could be better; no physical air-con controls; adjustable lumbar support costs extra

Red BMW iX2 boot open

Passenger & boot space

How it copes with people and clutter

A six-footer will have no trouble fitting in the front of a BMW iX2, thanks to plenty of head, leg and elbow room.

There’s plenty of storage space up front, too, including a pair of cupholders deep enough to hold a 500ml bottle. The lidded centre armrest is quite shallow (and hinged to only open up for easy access to the driver), but there's a larger storage tray beneath it on a lower tier.

Rear head room is slightly better than in the Volvo C40, with a six-foot occupant able to sit in the back without their head resting on the ceiling. There’s also plenty of leg room, although due to the iX2’s raised floor, there’s little space to tuck your feet under the front seats.

More positively, you can recline the iX2’s backrest to boost comfort, which is something you can’t do in either the Audi Q4 Sportback e-tron or C40.

A third rear passenger (sitting in the middle) won’t fancy a long journey, due to a big hump in the floor robbing them of foot space. The Q4 e-tron, with its flat floor, is better in that regard, while a Skoda Enyaq Coupé is far more generous. 

The iX2’s 525-litre boot capacity is a little down on the petrol X2's 560 litres, but there’s still enough space for a large buggy, a big shopping trip or luggage for a family holiday.

On paper, the boot volume is a little less (by 10 litres) than what you get in an Q4 Sportback e-tron, but more than what’s offered in the C40. The Enyaq Coupé is again the one to beat, though, offering 570 litres.

The load bay is a usefully square shape and has a couple of small storage areas on the side. A small load lip at the boot entrance isn’t awkward to lift heavy items over and while the height of the boot floor is fixed, that storage area underneath will easily swallow up the charging cables.

The C40 does come with an extra storage area under the bonnet, though – something the iX2 doesn't offer.

All iX2s have a powered tailgate for added convenience. You can also open and close the boot by sweeping your foot below a sensor underneath the bumper if you opt for the Technology Pack. 

The iX2 comes with a 40/20/40 split-folding rear bench as standard, which makes it easier to carry long loads and still fit four people in the car. You can’t fold down the rear backrest remotely from inside the boot, though – the release catches are mounted on the rear bench.

Practicality overview

Strengths Good leg room all round; decent-sized boot; reclining rear backrests

Weaknesses Foot room could be better; middle rear passenger has to straddle a hump in the floor

BMW iX2 interior driver display

Buying & owning

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

The iX2 costs a little more than a BMW iX1 with the same amount of kit, but has a higher starting price because the iX1 is available in less well-equipped trims.

The entry-level iX2 eDrive20 costs about the same as an entry-level Audi Q4 Sportback e-tron 45 in Sport trim. The cheapest Volvo C40 in entry-level Core trim is slightly cheaper than both.

The xDrive30 is quite a big leap up in price, and while a Q4 Sportback 55 is similarly quick, the C40 Twin Motor can be had for significantly less. You can check the latest prices on our new BMW deals page.

Both versions of the iX2 sit in the lowest benefit-in-kind (BIK) tax band, but the eDrive20 will cost a little less in salary sacrifice per month for company car drivers due to its lower P11D price. 

With a maximum charging speed of up to 130kW, a 10-80% charge will take around 30min. That’s virtually the same rate as the Volvo C40 and Q4 Sportback can charge at, although the Tesla Model Y can accept up to 250kW so is much faster to charge.

The only trim level (M Sport) comes with plenty of kit, including 19in alloy wheels, two-zone climate control, cruise control, automatic windscreen wipers, ambient lighting and heated front seats with part-leather upholstery.

Individual options include a panoramic sunroof and a heated steering wheel, while a few option packs are available, including the Technology Package that brings adaptive LED headlights, keyless entry, wireless phone charging and an auto-dimming rear-view mirror.

The iX2 was too new to feature in the 2023 What Car? Reliability Survey, but BMW finished 12th out of 32 brands in the overall manufacturer league table. That's above Audi, Jaguar and Mercedes, but a fair way below Lexus (which came first).

BMW’s three-year/unlimited-mileage warranty edges ahead of the three-year/60,000-mile warranties offered by Audi and Volvo. The battery comes with a separate warranty for eight years or 100,000 miles.

The iX2 is yet to be tested by safety experts Euro NCAP, but all versions come with automatic emergency braking (AEB) and a suite of airbags.

If you want more safety kit, there are two option packs available. The Driving Assistant pack adds blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert, while the pricier Driving Assistant Plus pack brings lane-keeping assistance, adaptive cruise control and traffic-sign recognition.

Buying & owning overview

Strengths Well equipped; doesn’t cost much more than equivalent iX1

Weaknesses Only one trim level available; limited standard safety kit; charging speed nothing to write home about

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FAQs

  • Depending on the version you go for, the iX2 can officially travel up to 267-283 miles.

  • The iX2 is built in Regensburg, Germany.

At a glance
New car deals
Save up to £3,415
Target Price from £49,206
Save up to £3,415
or from £503pm
Swipe to see used car deals
Nearly new deals
From £48,000
RRP price range £51,615 - £61,765
Number of trims (see all)1
Number of engines (see all)2
Available fuel types (which is best for you?)electric
Available doors options 5
Warranty 3 years / No mileage cap
Company car tax at 20% (min/max) £103 / £123
Company car tax at 40% (min/max) £206 / £247
Available colours