Range Rover review

Category: Luxury SUV

Section: Costs & verdict

Range Rover 2021 rear seats
  • Range Rover 2021 front tracking
  • Range Rover 2021 rear tracking
  • Range Rover 2021 dashboard
  • Range Rover 2021 rear seats
  • Land Rover Range Rover 2018 infotainment RHD
  • Range Rover 2021 wide front cornering
  • Range Rover 2021 wide rear tracking
  • Range Rover 2021 left panning
  • Range Rover 2021 dashboard
  • Range Rover P400e 2021 front seats
  • Range Rover 2021 boot open
  • Range Rover 2021 front tracking
  • Range Rover 2021 rear tracking
  • Range Rover 2021 dashboard
  • Range Rover 2021 rear seats
  • Land Rover Range Rover 2018 infotainment RHD
  • Range Rover 2021 wide front cornering
  • Range Rover 2021 wide rear tracking
  • Range Rover 2021 left panning
  • Range Rover 2021 dashboard
  • Range Rover P400e 2021 front seats
  • Range Rover 2021 boot open
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In this section:
  • Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2
  • Equipment, options and extras
  • Reliability
  • Safety and security

Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2

The Range Rover is an expensive car, and it’s possible to make it much more expensive with just a brief flirtation with the options list. You can make your money go further with the cheaper Audi Q7 and BMW X7, but even the Range Rover looks good value (at least in the entry-level and mid-spec trims) next to the Bentley Bentayga and Rolls-Royce Cullinan. Opt for the D300 it won't cost you too much in fuel, because that should average 35mpg on a long run if driven sensibly.  

The D300 won’t be a cheap car to pay benefit-in-kind (BIK) tax on, though. The P400e is by far the most affordable for a company car user: it has the lowest CO2 emissions and a decent electric-only range, so it more or less halves the percentage of tax you'll pay compared with the regular petrol and diesel models. Don't forget that the percentage is paid on the P11D value, so you should also stick to the cheaper trims and limit the number of options you add for the lowest BIK. 

 

Equipment, options and extras

Entry-level Vogue trim has plenty of kit, so we'd recommend sticking with that. You get Windsor leather seats, heated seats in the front, a heated steering wheel, three-zone climate control, walnut veneer, keyless entry, a gesture-controlled powered tailgate, an auto-dimming rear-view mirror, power-folding door mirrors, a fixed panoramic glass roof, cruise control, and we've already mentioned the 20-way electric front seats, the infotainment system, the adaptive LED headlights and the parking aids. What more do you really need? 

Still, all Range Rovers have sophisticated electronic systems to keep you on the straight and narrow, and that applies whether you’re on an A-road or venturing into the wilderness. You get automatic emergency braking (AEB) and lane-departure warning as standard on Vogue trim, while Vogue SE adds a rear-cross traffic alert that stops the car if you're reversing out a driveway into the path of another vehicle, exit alert that warns if your opening a door into the path of a passing cyclist, blindspot monitoring, a driver fatigue monitor and traffic sign recognition. Lane-keeping assistance, which actually operates the steering if you wander out of your lane, is added from Autobiography trim.

The car's anti-theft technology is state of the art, too, prompting Thatcham Research to award the car the maximum five stars for resisting being stolen and four out of five for resisting being broken into.

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Overview

If you're after supreme comfort, masses of passenger space, a lovely interior and a smooth and powerful engine, the sumptuous Range Rover will do it all. However, we think the entry-level D300 diesel Vogue is all you really need, with maybe a few choice options, or the P400e plug-in hybrid if you're a company car buyer looking to save on tax. That's because the cheaper Audi Q7 and BMW X7 are at least as good in most respects, and the top-end versions of the Range Rover are just too expensive unless money really is no object. In which case, why not have a look at the Bentley Bentayga. Just be aware that Land Rover's reliability record is pretty shocking.

  • Comfortable and quiet to drive
  • D300 diesel is smooth and has plenty of low-down flexibility
  • Prodigious off-road ability
  • More expensive to buy but not objectively better than the BMW X7
  • Five seats only
  • Reliability is a concern
New car deals
Target Price from £99,375
or from £968pm
Swipe to see used and leasing deals
Nearly new deals
From £89,000