Driving

Land Rover Range Rover review

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Range Rover
Review continues below...
10 Mar 2016 10:48 | Last updated: 18 Sep 2018 16:04

In this review

Driving

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

Land Rover Range Rover 4x4 performance

If you want sports car performance from your luxury SUV, go for the supercharged V8 petrol, which serves up almost indecent pace. However, most buyers will be served better by either of the diesels.

The 4.4-litre V8 sits atop the diesel range and is seriously impressive. It makes a lovely burble at idle and generates ample torque (516lb ft, to be precise) from as little as 1750rpm, allowing for measured acceleration and easy cruising. If you want the ultimate Range Rover experience, this is the engine to go for.

However, the downside to the V8 is its monumental list price. And, despite producing a nicer engine note, you’d be hard-pressed to notice the V6’s slightly inferior shove in normal day-to-day motoring, so that’s the engine we’d recommend.

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We have yet to try the 335bhp V6 petrol option, but since it’s shared with sister brand Jaguar’s F-Type sports car, you can bet it offers considerable pace.

The P400e, with its 2.0-litre petrol-electric hybrid drivetrain, is surprising swift, with a 0-62mph time of just 6.4sec (versus 6.9sec for the SDV6). However, the P400e is best enjoyed at a relaxed pace, because the electric motor – with 31 miles of range – allows for near-silent running. Once you start to really flex your right foot, the 2.0-litre engine kicks into life and emits an unconvincing four-cylinder drone – not what you expect from a luxurious SUV.

Land Rover Range Rover 4x4 ride

The Range Rover has been designed to cope with surfaces that resemble the moon, so even the worst British roads don’t pose much of a problem.

All editions of the car get cross-linked air suspension as standard, and it provides a mix of supple ride and body control that most luxury saloons can’t match, let alone any other SUV. That said, the hybrid P400e isn’t quite as supple as a standard Range Rover, because it comes with fractionally firmer suspension that’s necessary to keep the extra weight of the batteries in check.

You can also raise and lower the entire car by pressing buttons on the centre console. Access height lowers the car to aid getting in, while off-road height raises the car up to help tackle muddy terrain.

Land Rover Range Rover

Land Rover Range Rover 4x4 handling

You never forget that you're driving a tall, two-tonne, top-heavy SUV when you're behind the wheel of the Range Rover, but the car is more agile than you may expect. It feels precise and inspires confidence in most situations, allowing you to place it accurately on the road.

Should you decide to really chuck the Range Rover at a twisty B-road, though, it does start to pitch and lean more in bends than you’d like. Even a well-sorted car of this size and height has its limits. It’s also worth noting that the extra weight of the SDV8 diesel makes the steering a little less accurate than it is in the the SDV6, although no Range Rover gives you much feedback through the wheel. Weight build-up is good, however.

Land Rover Range Rover 4x4 refinement

Refinement is one of the Range Rover’s strongest areas. It’s particularly impressive cruising at high speeds, when it does an excellent job of isolating you from the elements, thanks in part to an acoustically laminated windscreen that’s standard on all versions. It’s more hushed than most luxury saloons, in fact; only the Mercedes S-Class can claim to be quieter.

Engine noise isn’t an issue with any of the units on offer, but the P400e is truly exceptional at low speeds. With 31 miles of pure-electric range, you can cruise around town pretty much in silence – a serene experience that feels perfectly in tune with the ethos of a Range Rover. Then, once you’ve used up all of your electric power, the electric motor seamlessly passes the load-lugging baton onto the 2.0-litre petrol engine. In fact, at town speeds it can be difficult to decipher exactly when the handover took place, such is the refinement of this hybrid system.

 

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There are 5 trims available for the Range Rover 4x4. Click to see details.See all versions
SVAutobiography Dynamic
This range-topping version gets all the luxury of the SVAutobiography models, but also a lower ride height and driver-focused chassis settings designed to offer a more involving drive...View trim
Fuel Petrol
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£137,379
Average Saving £4,906
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SVAutobiography
This luxurious trim has a price to match. On top of all that the lesser models have, it brings a 1700W Meridian sound system, a rear-seat entertainment set-up, quilted leather semi-aniline seats, a...View trim
Fuel Diesel, Petrol/Plug-In Elec Hybrid, Petrol
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£162,683
Average Saving £5,898
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Vogue
Entry-level trim gets plenty of kit, including a heated windscreen, folding door mirrors, rain-sensing wipers, metallic paint, 20in alloy wheels, leather seats, cruise control and a 10.0in twin-scr...View trim
Fuel Diesel, Petrol/Plug-In Elec Hybrid
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£79,097
Average Saving £2,803
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OUR PICK
Vogue SE
Mid-spec Vogue SE adds a few extra features and looks like the sweet spot of the range. You get 21in wheels, an incredible 19-speaker Meridian sound system, 20-way heated and cooled front seats and...View trim
Fuel Diesel, Petrol/Plug-In Elec Hybrid
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£85,466
Average Saving £3,034
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Autobiography
Autobiography has a lavish specification that befits its sky-high price, with a sliding panoramic roof, more powerful ‘pixel’ LED headlights, massaging front seats and a heated leather/wood steerin...View trim
Fuel Diesel, Petrol/Plug-In Elec Hybrid, Petrol
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£97,432
Average Saving £3,468
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