Range Rover review

Category: Luxury SUV

Section: Passenger & boot space

Available fuel types:petrol, diesel, hybrid
Available colours:
Range Rover 2021 rear seats
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RRP £83,525What Car? Target Price from£79,651
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Passenger & boot space

How it copes with people and clutter

Front space

No car as big and wide as a Range Rover should have a problem accommodating two sizeable adults alongside each other and, sure enough, front-seat occupants have plenty of space. Even with the large central storage compartment and individual armrests in place, there's leg, head and shoulder room to spare. 

There’s a decent selection of cubbyholes, too, including the aforementioned central storage area, an oddment bin under the main armrest, sizeable door pockets and twin gloveboxes.

Rear space

Once you’ve clambered up into the back of the Range Rover, it’s easy to get comfortable. There’s oodles of space for two tall adults to stretch out; even three adults sitting side-by-side will be fine on a longer trip given the amount of leg, head and shoulder room on offer.

You can opt for the Executive Class seating pack, which is standard from Autobiography trim. This introduces a reclining function for the two outer rear seats and a big, fold-down armrest that makes the passengers feel more segregated. You can go further by ordering the Executive Class Comfort seating, which adds a hot-stone massage function, adjustable side bolsters, heated footrests and soft pillows for the head restraints. That's standard on the SVAutobiography.

You can also buy a long-wheelbase version of the Range Rover, which puts the amount of rear leg room on a par with that of the average executive jet; or at least the Mercedes S-Class and Rolls-Royce Ghost. What you can't have are seven seats. The Audi Q7, BMW X7 and even the cheaper Range Rover Sport all offer that facility.

Range Rover 2021 rear seats

Seat folding and flexibility

Technically, the Range Rover has 60/40 split-folding rear seats, but because centre rear the armrest folds down and it's hinged almost at boot floor level, it's effectively as versatile as 40/20/40 seating. The back seats fold down electrically using buttons situated by the tailgate opening. Now, before you shout "oh, how clever", it is painful.

You have to watch as they glacially motor down and the front seats also have to move forward at a snail’s pace to allow this to happen. Then, the front seat doesn't return to its original position. After a lot of head scratching, you realise this is because the headrests on the rear seats are still in place and stopping them moving back. So they need to be removed (manually, which rather defeats the whole motorised seat-folding adventure) and you can only do this by lifting the backrests up again. And again, that process is as long as an ice age. “Errgh!” Honestly, pressing a couple of release levers and doing it all manually would be a hundred times easier. 

The Range Rover doesn't offer any other clever freight-carrying tricks, such as a front passenger seatback that folds fully forward to accommodate really long loads, but the passenger seat does come with 20-way (or 24-way from Autobiography trim) electric adjustment and a memory function. 

Boot space

You won’t want for luggage capacity in the Range Rover. There’s more than enough space for all the passengers' luggage, or a couple of baby buggies, or a couple of sets of golf clubs.

The boot floor is flat and it's so vast (at 707 litres with all the seats in place) that actually reaching into the depths of the load bay can be tricky; that’s because the Range Rover has a two-piece tailgate, and the lower section folds out level with the boot floor and gets in the way. It does make a handy picnic seat, though. As mentioned earlier, you can lower the car's air suspension, by pressing a button in the boot, but even then, shorter individuals will have to climb into the boot to retrieve items wedged against the back seat.

Unfortunately, like the majority of hybrid cars, the P400e version sacrifices some boot space (including the full-size spare wheel well) to accommodate its battery pack. Land Rover claims boot space is reduced by up to 98 litres, with the boot floor raised by 46mm. That said, the space that remains is still generous. Versions fitted with the Executive Class rear seating also lose a chunk of boot space and the volume reduces to 537 litres. 

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