Driving

Hyundai i10 review

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Hyundai i10
Review continues below...
3 Jan 2017 00:00 | Last updated: 21 Aug 2018 10:28

In this review

Driving

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

Hyundai i10 hatchback performance

Two petrol engines are available: a 1.0-litre three-cylinder and a 1.2-litre four-cylinder. The 1.0’s snappy throttle response is great for zipping away from the lights in town. It does, however, start to feel out of its depth as the speeds rise on motorways or even fast A-roads.

The livelier 1.2 is fine on any road thanks to a reasonable amount of mid-range puff. That said, it still needs a thrashing to hang onto the coattails of a Kia Picanto, despite having exactly the same 1.2 engine. You have to opt for the 1.2 if you want an automatic gearbox because the 1.0 is manual-only.

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Hyundai i10 hatchback ride

The i10's suspension is forgiving enough to cope with all but the sharpest of potholes. In fact, around town, the ride is actually very settled – by city car standards, at least.

However, there is quite a lot of bounce over high-speed undulations, which can be a bit unnerving along bucking country roads. The rival VW Up (and its near-identical Skoda Citigo and Seat Mii siblings) feels altogether better tied down and less floaty.

Hyundai i10

Hyundai i10 hatchback handling

The i10 isn't as fun to drive as some city cars, including the VW Up and Skoda Citigo, and that's largely down to the steering. It's rather vague and overly keen to self-centre, which doesn't inspire much confidence on faster, twisting roads. However, it’s light enough to make parking easy, and there’s ultimately plenty of grip when you want to get a bit more of a move on.

Unlike some rivals, the i10 also feels stable at high speeds; it isn't affected too badly by crosswinds on the motorway.

Hyundai i10 hatchback refinement

The 1.0-litre engine is exceptionally hushed for a three-cylinder. In fact, it’s actually quieter than the four-cylinder 1.2 much of the time. By city car standards, the i10 is also brilliant at shutting out wind and road noise.

The only slight disappointment is that the five-speed manual gearbox isn’t quite as slick as the one used in both the Skoda Citigo and VW Up. The optional four-speed automatic changes gear quite slowly, so you’re well aware of the pause in momentum if you’re accelerating hard, but in laid-back use it’s smooth enough. In fact, it’s the best automatic in this class.

 

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There are 5 trims available for the i10 hatchback. Click to see details.See all versions
SE
Adds air-conditioning, electric rear windows, cruise control and remote central locking, so you can lock or unlock the car by pressing a button on the key fob. You also get Bluetooth and a DAB radi...View trim
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Go SE
We are yet to try out this variant...View trim
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Premium
The cheapest way to get alloy wheels, and you also get a smartphone holder on top of your dashboard, along with privacy glass and LED daytime running lights. We reckon it's worth stretching to Prem...View trim
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Premium SE
Replaces Premium trim’s 14in alloys with 15in versions, and adds an electric tilt and slide glass sunroof, a briliant 7.0in touchscreen infotainment system, heated front seats and even a heated ste...View trim
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S
The cheapest trim, but very basic, with no air-conditioning. You do get a USB socket, electric front windows and central locking, but it's worth upgrading to at least SE trim if you can....View trim
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