Suzuki Swift review

Category: Small car

Section: Introduction

Suzuki Swift 2022 front right cornering
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 front right cornering
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 right rear tracking
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 interior dashboard
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 interior rear seats
  • Suzuki Swift 2019 RHD dashboard and front seats
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 interior infotainment detail
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 right panning
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 exterior rear detail
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 interior front seats
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 boot open
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 front right cornering
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 right rear tracking
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 interior dashboard
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 interior rear seats
  • Suzuki Swift 2019 RHD dashboard and front seats
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 interior infotainment detail
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 right panning
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 exterior rear detail
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 interior front seats
  • Suzuki Swift 2022 boot open
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Introduction

What Car? says...

Chocolate bars. New-build affordable homes. Life savings. In today’s world, so many things seem to be getting smaller. Cars, though, seem to be swelling, and the Suzuki Swift is a notable exception. Still, this latest version of the small hatchback continues to make a lot of sense in our increasingly congested cities. 

While rivals have grown over the years, the Swift retains its compact dimensions and is priced to offer value for money, being closer in price to the Dacia Sandero and undercutting comparable alternatives such as the Ford Fiesta, Peugeot 208 and VW Polo. There’s also a racier Swift Sport, which we’ve reviewed separately.

FAQs

  • The Suzuki Swift came third in the small car class of our 2021 What Car? Reliability Survey (behind the Hyundai i10 and Dacia Sandero). Just 3% of owners told us their cars went wrong, and their problems were all with the air-conditioning. As a brand, Suzuki finished joint third (with Hyundai) out of 30 car makers, beaten only by Dacia and premium manufacturer Lexus. A three-year, 60,000-mile warranty is standard with every Swift. Read more here

  • The Suzuki Swift has mild-hybrid engine technology, which can lower running costs. That means it has a small battery and motor providing enough electric power to help the engine but not run on electricity alone. There is no electric car or plug-in hybrid (PHEV) version of the Swift (or its rivals the Ford Fiesta and Volkswagen Polo). Read more here

  • We think the mid-range SZ-T trim is worth going for in the Suzuki Swift because it comes with lots of kit but doesn’t push the asking price too high. It comes with a touchscreen infotainment system with Apple Carplay and Android Auto smartphone mirroring, a rear-view camera to help with parking, front fog lights and alloy wheels. The 89bhp 1.0-litre Boosterjet petrol engine has plenty of low-down pulling power. Read more here

  • The main difference here is that the Suzuki Swift Sport is, technically, a hot hatchback variant of the Swift. It gets 127bhp from its 1.4-litre mild-hybrid petrol engine and is fun to drive, although the official 0-62mph time of 9.1sec is not particularly quick. The Swift SZ-T is the well-equipped mid-range trim version of the standard Swift, and comes with a 1.2-litre petrol engine producing 83bhp. Read more here

  • It depends which trim you choose. The entry-level Suzuki Swift SZ-L comes with a DAB radio, Bluetooth connectivity and not much else. If you go for SZ-T or SZ5 trim, you get a 7.0in infotainment touchscreen. The screen’s menus are easy to navigate but the graphics are outdated. Many small cars have better systems. Read more here

  • The Suzuki Swift has a 265-litre boot. That’s big enough to fit in four carry-on suitcases or your weekly shop, but many small cars offer more space, including the Ford Fiesta and Skoda Fabia. The Swift’s rear seats split 60/40 and fold down easily to create a larger load area for bigger items, but there is an annoyingly high lip at the entrance, making it harder to load heavy items. Read more here

At a glance
New car deals
Save up to £328
Target Price from £15,314
Save up to £328
or from £182pm
Swipe to see used and leasing deals
Leasing deals
From £200pm
RRP price range £15,499 - £22,570
Number of trims (see all)4
Number of engines (see all)2
Available fuel types (which is best for you?)petrol
MPG range across all versions 50.4 - 59.7
Available doors options 5
Warranty 3 years / 60000 miles
Company car tax at 20% (min/max) £764 / £1,295
Company car tax at 40% (min/max) £1,528 / £2,591
Available colours