Hyundai Ioniq 5 review

Category: Large Electric

Section: Performance & drive

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Performance & drive

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

The entry-level Hyundai Ioniq 5 is fitted with a 58kWh battery and a 168bhp motor, which powers the rear wheels and gives it a 0-62mph time of 8.5sec. Then there’s a bigger, 73kWh battery with a 215bhp electric motor, also driving the rear wheels, for 0-62mph in 7.4sec.

At the top of the line-up is the version we tested. It has the same 73kWh battery, but there's an extra motor on the front axle, making it four-wheel drive and giving it 302bhp. With 0-62mph taking just 5.2sec, it's a bit quicker than the Mustang Mach-E Extended Range AWD and much quicker than any VW ID.4. It will even get close to the entry-level Tesla Model 3 in a straight line.

This impressive performance is combined with light, smooth and accurate steering. And, thanks to a comparatively low centre of gravity, the Ioniq 5 feels more nimble than large electric SUVs such as the Mach-E and ID.4. Among rivals, only the Model 3 offers tighter body control and sharper handling.

As for the ride, the Ioniq 5 wafts along nicely at motorway speeds, but on undulating A-roads the vertical body movement is a bit bouncier than you’d like, and on 20in wheels the the ride has a slightly lumpen feel in town. It stops short of being uncomfortable, but the ID.4 is both more forgiving and more controlled.

The Ioniq 5's range on a full charge depends which version you go for. Official figures are up to 240 miles for the 58kWh rear-wheel drive, up to 300 for the 73kWh rear-wheel drive and 287 for the 73kWh all-wheel drive.

That falls short of the headline-grabbing 380 miles the Mach-E can manage, but the figures are there or thereabouts for what you’d expect from a new electric car in this price range and should still be enough to fit plenty of people's lifestyles.

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