Skoda Superb Estate review

Category: Estate car

Section: Performance & drive

Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 rear cornering
  • Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 front right tracking
  • Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 rear cornering
  • Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 interior dashboard
  • Skoda Superb Estate interior rear seats
  • Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 interior infotainment
  • Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 front static
  • Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 rear right tracking
  • Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 interior driver display
  • Skoda Superb Estate interior front seats
  • Skoda Superb Estate boot open
  • Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 boot cable storage
  • Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 front right tracking
  • Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 rear cornering
  • Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 interior dashboard
  • Skoda Superb Estate interior rear seats
  • Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 interior infotainment
  • Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 front static
  • Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 rear right tracking
  • Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 interior driver display
  • Skoda Superb Estate interior front seats
  • Skoda Superb Estate boot open
  • Skoda Superb iV Estate 2021 boot cable storage
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In this section:
  • Engine, 0-60mph and gearbox
  • Suspension and ride comfort
  • Handling
  • Noise and vibration

Performance & drive

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

Engine, 0-60mph and gearbox

If you fancy a petrol engine, the entry-level 148bhp 1.5 TSI 150 is surprisingly punchy and gutsy enough to cope with a car of this size. It’ll hit 0-62mph in a respectable 9.2sec. Need more power? Then go for the 187bhp 2.0 TSI 190, which is really lively, or the 276bhp 2.0 TSI 280. This wolf in sheep’s clothing hits 62mph from rest in just 5.3sec and is a legitimate rival on pace for the BMW M340i Touring.

However, the 148bhp 2.0 TDI 150 diesel is our pick of the range. Why's that? Well, flat-out it’s pokey but not rapid (0-62mph is a decent 9.2sec but that's a little slower than the Audi A4 Avant 35 TDI) yet, for a large estate car that’s likely to carry heavy loads or tow, nothing beats a diesel’s low-down grunt. You simply don't have to work it as hard as a petrol to make handsome progress. In fact, it’s so good that you don't need to pay the extra for the 197bhp 2.0 TDI 200 diesel, unless you must have its extra welly.

Suspension and ride comfort

While the Superb Estate doesn't dwell with the A4 Avant among the best-riding cars in the class, it’s as supple as the Volkswagen Passat Estate and softer than the 3 Series Touring. If you want to put comfort first, stick to the smallest 17in alloy wheels that come with the lower trims. That said, even the Sportline Plus trim, with its big 19in alloy wheels and stiffer suspension settings, is hardly crude.

The regular trims on their standard suspension soak up large speed bumps and expansion joints with ease and settle down nicely on a motorway cruise. Because the set-up is quite soft, the Superb is prone to feeling floaty on undulating country roads (less so the stiffer Sportline Plus trim) but it can bash over nasty potholes, in the same way the Mazda 6 Tourer does.

The A4 Avant also has some of the quietest engines, especially its diesels. Again, the Superb’s engines are not as good but nor are they raucous under acceleration, and at motorway speeds they’re a distant hum at most. The plug-in PHEV iV has the ability to switch off its petrol engine; when that happens it’s super quiet, especially around town.

You’ll find the six-speed manual gearbox is slick and the clutch action is positive, making the Superb easy to drive smoothly. The dual-clutch automatic gearbox (it’s either optional or standard depending on the engine you go for) can be jerky in stop-start traffic and when you're edging into a parking space. It’s smooth the rest of the time.