Vauxhall Mokka-e review

Category: Small Electric

Section: Costs & verdict

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Vauxhall Mokka-e 2021 RHD infotainment
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Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

If you’re in the market for a relatively affordable EV and you’re not too bothered about passenger space or battery range, there are quite a few cheaper options than the Vauxhall Mokka-e. These include the Fiat 500Honda EMini Electric and Mazda MX-30.

The larger Kia e-Niro 39kWh is priced closely to the entry-level Mokka-e, while the e-Niro Long Range, Peugeot e-2008 and Volkswagen ID.3 are a bit more expensive. Don't forget that you get a government grant that reduces the list price, though, so be sure to check if that's been factored in when comparing prices. 

If you decide on a Mokka-e, we’d recommend sticking with the entry-level SE Nav Premium, because it comes with all the infotainment and visibility aids we’ve already covered, plus a haul of other goodies that include adaptive cruise control, rain-sensitive windscreen wipers, keyless start, automatic climate control and a flat-bottomed, leather-wrapped steering wheel.

The Elite Nav Premium models come with even more kit, such as keyless entry, heated seats, a heated steering wheel and a larger infotainment system, but that pushes the Mokka-e’s price too close to superior EVs including the ID.3 and long-range e-Niro.

Unfortunately, the Mokka-e is predicted to suffer from depreciation than many EVs, which makes it less appealing for private buyers. However, if you’re a company car driver, all-electric cars look like good value at the moment thanks to the benefit-in-kind (BIK) tax saving that they offer over petrol and diesel cars. There are also huge savings to be had on the cost of electricity versus petrol or diesel, and the more miles you cover, the more you’ll claw back. 

But how long does it take to charge the Mokka-e? Well, you’re looking at around 7.5hrs from a 7kW home wall box (0-100%) or 45 minutes (0-80%) using a 50kW service station charger. If you can find a 100kW charger, you can get that charge in 30 minutes – just enough time to grab yourself a coffee and panini to go. 

The Mokka is yet to be tested by safety experts Euro NCAP, but we'd expect it to attract a similar score to the Peugeot 2008 – a car that uses the same mechanical underpinnings. Automatic emergency braking (AEB), lane-keeping assistance, adaptive cruise control and a driver drowsiness alert system are fitted across the range, while blindspot monitoring is standard on Elite Nav Premium models and above.

The Vauxhall Mokka-e is too new to feature in the latest What Car? Reliability Survey, but Vauxhall as a manufacturer performed poorly, finishing 27th out of 31 manufacturers. That’s above Renault, but below most other key rivals, including Citroën, Ford, Seat and Volkswagen. Every new Vauxhall comes with a three-year or 60,000-mile warranty, while the Mokka-e’s battery is covered by a separate eight-year or 100,000-mile warranty.

Vauxhall Mokka-e 2021 RHD infotainment

Overview

The Mokka-e offers buyers sharp looks, a decent range, a generous amount of standard kit and a relatively comfy and quiet ride. However, if you’re looking for a funky urban EV, there are cheaper options available, such as the Fiat 500 and Mazda MX-30. Those looking for an EV to ‘do it all’, meanwhile, would be far better off with a Kia e-Niro or Volkswagen ID.3, both of which are more spacious and will go much farther on a charge.

  • Comfortable ride
  • Impressively quiet at speed
  • Plenty of standard kit
  • e-Niro and ID.3 have longer ranges
  • Cheap feeling interior
  • Not that quick by EV standards

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