Ford Transit Courier review

Category: Small Van

Section: Interior

Star rating
Ford Transit Courier load space
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Interior

The interior layout, fit and finish

The Transit Courier also owes a debt of gratitude to the Fiesta for its interior. While the materials used are a little more focused on commercial needs, with fewer chrome and piano black highlights, the basic shape and function of the Courier's dashboard is almost identical to the Fiesta’s.

Equipment from the car range is also carried over; most importantly for a small van, the Fiesta's rake and reach adjustable steering wheel and a four-way adjustable seat are present in the Courier. A basic radio is fitted as standard; a unit with a 4-inch screen is the next option up, followed by a 6-inch touchscreen. Both run Ford’s SYNC 3 system but only the latter offers Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility. The 6in system is standard on Limited trim vans. Strangely, Sport trim – which many would consider to be the top specification – does not get the bigger screen as standard.

Underlining just how sparse the kit list is on the entry-level Leader models, even Ford itself is left to highlight the A4 document storage and centre consoles with two cupholders among the main frills. That said, the storage in the door pockets and the provision of a decent sized glovebox for such a small van add moderate functionality.

Trend models give you underseat and overhead storage compartments, an eight-way adjustable driver’s seat, a locking glovebox, electric windows, automatic headlights and wipers, and that 4in screen with DAB radio. There’s also a 12v power point inside the rear loadspace, and a side loading door.

Limited trim level adds to that, with manual air-conditioning, rear-parking sensors and the 6in touchscreen. Limited vans also get body coloured bumpers, door handles and mirrors as well as 15in alloy wheels.

The Sport trim level doesn’t build on the Limited spec van kit list, but rather the Trend model, adding a leather gear knob and gaiter with contrast red stitching, plus manual air-conditioning. The rest of the alterations are to the exterior and include sports stripes, black-painted heated door mirrors, body coloured side mouldings and 16in alloys.

All four models are comfortable, well designed and well-made, but for the level of equipment on offer we’d recommend the Trend as the best starting point. If you really feel the need to add the larger touchscreen, you’ll need around £1000 more to step up to Limited or specify it as an option. It’s a good system and will enhance the user experience over the sometimes-buggy SYNC 3 (although software updates have made it vastly more reliable).

The seats in the Courier are particularly supportive and the extra adjustment of the seat on Trend trim and above is an added benefit. The steering wheel is also a pleasantly sporty shape; that's an odd point of praise for a van, but thumb notches at the nine and three positions make it quite relaxing to grip and control the telephone or infotainment controls.

Space throughout the cab isn’t plentiful, but this is a small van. You can get comfortable, but the more adaptable seat of Trend models and above is highly recommended to help you do so.

Ford Transit Courier load space

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