Lexus UX300e review

Category: Large Electric

Section: Introduction

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Lexus UX300e 2020
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  • Lexus UX300e 2020 front seats
  • Lexus UX300e 2020 boot open
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Introduction

What Car? says...

On paper, you’d have to conclude that the Lexus UX300e is a car destined for success. For a start, it’s electric and therefore belongs to the hottest sector of the car market. And for seconds, it’s an SUV. In short, Lexus couldn’t have designed a car that is more ‘in vogue’. 

Before we begin, however, we must point out that Lexus doesn’t see its UX300e as a rival for other electric SUVs such as the Hyundai Kona Electric, Kia e-Niro or Peugeot e-2008. As the only “only all-electric crossover SUV in the premium segment” Lexus would prefer you to view the UX as a natural rival to the Tesla Model 3 and Polestar 2. Now, that might seem a bit of a leap at first, but when you consider the entry level car costs more than a Model 3 Standard Range Plus, it only seems fair to compare it to other premium propositions. 

However you look at it though, the UX300e will have its work cut out. All of those aforementioned ‘rivals’ have a longer range than the UX300e’s claimed 196 miles, and while a 0-62mph of 7.5 seconds and a top speed of 100mph are perfectly respectable figures, it won’t be grabbing any headlines. 

In terms of styling, Lexus, like Peugeot, believes that buyers of full-EV models want their cars to look as 'normal' as possible. Therefore, the design team for the UX300e has had an easy job; the only visual changes to differentiate it from the regular UX are a more aerodynamic front grille, special 17-inch 'aero-ventilating' alloy wheels and different badges. 

Over the next few pages we’ll be exploring more than just aesthetics, however. We’ll be investigating what the UX300e is like to drive, how plush and spacious it is, plus how much it’ll cost you to buy and run. And don’t forget, whatever electric car you settle on, our New Car Buying service could save you a packet, without you having to lift a finger.

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