Toyota Yaris review

Category: Small car

Section: Costs & verdict

Available fuel types:hybrid
Available colours:
2020 Toyota Yaris touchscreen
Add to shortlist
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 front cornering
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 rear left panning
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 LHD dashboard
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 rear seats
  • 2020 Toyota Yaris touchscreen
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 right panning
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 left panning
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 front left static
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 rear right static
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 grille detail
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 rear shoulder detail
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 front cornering
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 rear left panning
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 LHD dashboard
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 rear seats
  • 2020 Toyota Yaris touchscreen
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 right panning
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 left panning
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 front left static
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 rear right static
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 grille detail
  • Toyota Yaris 2020 rear shoulder detail
RRP £19,910What Car? Target Price from£19,435
Share review

Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2

The Yaris is one of the cheapest non-electric small cars to run, particularly for company car drivers. That's because they can take advantage of the the low rate of benefit-in-kind tax that comes from the car's low CO2 emissions (from as little as 92g/km).

What's more, the Yaris is the most efficient car we've ever put through our scientific True MPG test, averaging a whisker under 60mpg and managing an astonishing 80mpg around town. That makes even a Honda Jazz look thirsty.

The Yaris is pricier to buy than many other mainstream rivals, including the Volkswagen Polo. However, depreciation is predicted to be slow and Toyota's PCP finance offers are usually competitive.

Equipment, options and extras

The Yaris is well equipped, even in entry-level Icon trim; you get climate control, electric front windows, 16in alloy wheels, adaptive cruise control and the aforementioned reversing camera and 7.0in touchscreen infotainment system. It's our pick of the range.

Design is the next rung up the trim ladder and is also worth a look. For a reasonable fee it adds electric windows in the back, rear privacy glass and the larger 8.0in touchscreen system (see infotainment).

Dynamic and Excel trims bundle in even more kit, but also have sports suspension and 17in wheels that contribute to the firm ride around town that we mentioned earlier. For more information on what each trim comes with, take a look at our versions and specs page.

2020 Toyota Yaris touchscreen

Reliability

The latest Yaris was too new to have featured in the 2020 What Car? Reliability Survey, but there’s reason to be optimistic: Toyota finished in third place (out of 31 brands) in the overall manufacturer league table. For some context, Honda finished eighth and Volkswagen 20th.

A five-year/100,000-mile warranty comes as standard – this is longer than most of the Yaris’s rivals come with, although the Kia Rio gets seven years of cover (capped at 100,000 miles).

Safety and security

Toyota’s Safety Sense package is standard on all versions of the Yaris and brings automatic city braking technology (AEB), lane-keeping assistance and road sign display. Meanwhile, blind spot monitoring and rear cross traffic alert are optional on Dynamic trim (part of the City Pack) and standard on range-topping Excel.

Euro NCAP awarded the Yaris five stars (out of five) for overall safety, although the organisation did highlight that adult crash protection in a frontal impact could be better. The Honda Jazz hybrid scored slightly higher marks in this part of the test.

For all the latest reviews, advice and new car deals, sign up to the What Car? newsletter here

Overview

The Yaris has some real and important strengths, not least its superb fuel economy and the likelihood of excellent reliability. It should hold its value well, too, and while there are cheaper alternatives, you do get plenty of standard luxury and safety kit. However, the Yaris can’t match the Polo for interior quality, infotainment or ride comfort, and it's pretty cramped inside – especially compared with the Tardis-like Honda Jazz. Stick with the cheaper trim levels for the best value.

  • Excellent real-world fuel economy
  • Toyota's reliability record
  • Slow predicted depreciation
  • Below-par infotainment system
  • Firm ride – especially on models with 17in alloys
  • Cramped in the back

Also consider

Hyundai i20

2020 - present

A spacious small car that's decent to drive and should hold it...

Ford Ka+

The Ford Ka+ is decent to drive and has room for four adults...

Nissan Note

An extremely practical small MPV that's classy inside, cheap t...

Suzuki Baleno

The Suzuki Baleno is not the cheapest or most premium feeling...