Space & practicality

Porsche 911 review

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Porsche 911
Review continues below...
5 Jan 2016 14:04 | Last updated: 20 Sep 2018 10:58

In this review

Space & practicality

How it copes with people and clutter

Porsche 911 coupe front space

Coupés such as the 911 usually focus on sportiness instead of space, but the 911 makes the most of the room it does have. Both front seats are mounted low to the floor, so there is a decent amount of head room, even for tall adults. The centre console cuts through the interior, separating the driver and passenger, but it still leaves enough room for you both to stretch out.

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Storage space is less impressive. The glovebox is deep but quite narrow, making it hard to fit more than a few documents inside. Similarly, the two door bins on each side (one open and one with a hinged lid) are a mixed bag. The open bins are good for loose items but too narrow for a water bottle to fit easily, whereas the closed cubbies are mounted behind your elbow, making them tricky to access. There are also two intricate cupholders that slide out of the dashboard, as well as a shallow storage area under the central armrest that is deep enough for a wallet or phone.

Porsche 911 coupe rear space

Although there is a generous amount of space up front, the 911’s two rear seats are really only for emergencies, very young children or (more likely) as a place to put a coat or bag. The seats have no headrests, are narrow and are split by the wide transmission tunnel. You can just about fit an Isofix child seat on either side, but try to squeeze an adult in the back and they won’t thank you for it.

Access isn’t great, either, due to the sloping roof that also severely restricts the amount of head room on offer.

There is a tiny, shallow cubbyhole between the two seats, but otherwise rear passengers have precious little storage space.

Porsche 911

Porsche 911 coupe seating flexibility

Adjusting the height or backrest angle of the front passenger seat is easy, thanks to a pair of switches on the side of the seat. Electric lumbar adjustment is standard as well. However, you have to pull a lever if you want to slide the front seats forward or backwards (full-electric seat adjustment is an optional extra). You also have to return the seats to their original position manually if you move them to get to the ones behind.

The rear seats split and fold down flat, allowing you to carry long items of luggage, such as a set of golf clubs, without much fuss.

Porsche 911 coupe boot space

The main luggage area is in the nose of the car. It offers 145 litres of space (four-wheel-drive models have slightly less) – that's enough for a soft weekend holdall or a few shopping bags. This is more space than you’ll find in an Audi R8, but considerably less than what a Jaguar F-Type Coupé offers.

Fold the rear seats down, though, and you get another 260 litres of luggage space, making the 911 surprisingly practical and giving a combined figure that’s on a par with a Volkswagen Golf’s with its rear seats up.

The front compartment is deep, but its square shape does limit what you can carry in it, while the area in the back is stepped. Still, when you consider that part of this rear luggage area sits above the engine, the 911 is pretty versatile.

 

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There are 9 trims available for the 911 coupe. Click to see details.See all versions
GT3
Equipment includes a 7.0in infotainment touchscreen with sat-nav and Bluetooth (but owners can delete this as a no-cost option), 20in alloy wheels, electric windows, climate control and a part-elec...View trim
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911
As standard, the Turbo comes with plenty of equipment, including Porsche's Sport Chrono Package, LED headlights, LED ambient interior lighting, automatic lights and wipers, dual-zone climate contro...View trim
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£129,987
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GT3 RS
Unlike the ‘standard’ GT3, the RS version only comes with a PDK automatic gearbox. You do, however, get active rear steer, PASM dampers, the same sized wheels as the mad GT2 RS and far more aggress...View trim
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£143,471
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S
Over the standard Turbo, you get an extra 40bhp, a fractionally quicker 0-62mph time of 2.9sec (versus the Turbo’s 3.0sec) and a top speed of 205mph (7mph higher than the standard car). A dynamic b...View trim
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£148,835
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GT2 RS
As standard, you get the Club Sport Package, which includes carbonfibre-backed seats, lightweight door trims and a sports steering wheel. However, we would recommend specifying the Weissach package...View trim
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£209,631
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911
The entry-level 911 comes with 19in alloy wheels, leather seats, sat-nav and a DAB radio as standard. It’s our favourite version, although – at the very least – you’ll want to pay extra for cruise...View trim
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T
Equipment additions include a standard limited-slip differential, Porsche’s highly effective PASM adaptive damping system, 20in rims and the Sport Chrono Package, with its steering wheel-mounted mo...View trim
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£86,871
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S
Comes with 20in wheels, leather seats, sat-nav and a DAB radio as standard. However, you’ll want to pay extra for cruise control, parking sensors, heated seats and rain-sensing wipers...View trim
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£88,630
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GTS
It comes with a PDK automatic gearbox; a manual ’box is not available. The motorsport-influenced GT3 is cheaper and more sparsely equipped than the Turbo models, but it’s also more fun to drive...View trim
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£97,090
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