BMW M135i review

Category: Hot hatch

Section: Introduction

Available fuel types:petrol
Available colours:
BMW M135i xDrive 2019 RHD press front tracking
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  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 RHD press front tracking
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 RHD press rear tracking
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 RHD dashboard
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 rear seats
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 infotainment
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 front head-on cornering
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 rear badge detail
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 RHD instrument cluster detail
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 RHD front seats
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 RHD boot open
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 RHD press front tracking
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 RHD press rear tracking
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 RHD dashboard
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 rear seats
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 infotainment
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 front head-on cornering
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 rear badge detail
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 RHD instrument cluster detail
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 RHD front seats
  • BMW M135i xDrive 2019 RHD boot open
RRP £37,685What Car? Target Price from£35,782
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Introduction

What Car? says...

Like the less extreme models in the 1 Series range, the latest generation BMW M135i is a very different kettle of fish to its predecessor. First up, that means no rear-wheel drive, and, in the case of the M135i, the six-cylinder engine has gone, too. It's now a turbocharged 2.0-litre four-cylinder that's coupled to four-wheel drive.

Is that a good or a bad thing? Well, it all depends on how wedded you are to the idea of doing massive, smokey burnouts and tail slides around every corner. BMW’s research would seem to suggest that, while some folks love the thought, in reality, buyers want a useable, predictable car. This is a hot hatch, after all, and not a track-oriented supercar.

Four-wheel drive should provide stable handling, and the smaller, four-cylinder engine should make the M135i a more economical car to run than the ‘big six’ engine of the previous models. Of course, we’re here to tell you whether that’s the truth of it, and if it is, whether the M135i has become a bit too sanitised or still manages to be fun. After all, this is a hot hatch, right?

And there’s the rub of it. Hot hatches do have a fine line to tread between everyday driving, family life, but still putting a smile on your face when you head out for a blast. They also come in all shapes and sizes, from the zesty Toyota GR Yaris, the racecar-like Honda Civic Type R, to the M135i’s nearest rivals, in terms of image, the Audi S3 Sportback and Mercedes A35 AMG.

Over the next few pages you’ll find out how much fun the BMW M135i is, what it’s like inside and what you get for your money. And, whichever hot hatch takes your fancy, don’t forget to look at our New Car Buying pages for handy and healthy savings.

At a glance

Number of trims1 see more
Available fuel typespetrol
MPG range across all versions38.7 - 39.8
Avaliable doors options5
Warranty3 years / No mileage cap

How much is it?

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