BMW M5 review

Category: Luxury car

Section: Introduction

Available fuel types:petrol
Available colours:
BMW M5 Competition 2021 front
Add to shortlist
  • BMW M5 Competition 2021 front
  • BMW M5 2020 rear cornering
  • BMW M5 2020 dashboard
  • BMW M5 2020 rear seats
  • BMW M5 2020 instrument cluster
  • BMW M5 2020 front tracking
  • BMW M5 2020 right panning
  • BMW M5 2020 rear tracking
  • BMW M5 2020 steering wheel detail
  • BMW M5 2020 front seats
  • BMW M5 2020 interior detail
  • BMW M5 Competition 2021 front
  • BMW M5 2020 rear cornering
  • BMW M5 2020 dashboard
  • BMW M5 2020 rear seats
  • BMW M5 2020 instrument cluster
  • BMW M5 2020 front tracking
  • BMW M5 2020 right panning
  • BMW M5 2020 rear tracking
  • BMW M5 2020 steering wheel detail
  • BMW M5 2020 front seats
  • BMW M5 2020 interior detail
RRP £102,385What Car? Target Price from£89,664
Share review

Introduction

What Car? says...

“The best defence is a good offence” is an adage that has been applied to many fields of endeavour, including sports and military combat, but it’s equally relevant to the car you’re currently reading about: the BMW M5. You see, the sixth-generation M5 has been on sale for less than five years, and yet, it’s already undergone a number of quite significant changes. 

When it first went on sale back in 2018, it featured a heavily tweaked 591bhp version of its predecessor’s twin-turbocharged 4.4-litre V8 engine. Now you’d think that would probably be enough poke for the average consumer, but it was barley a year before BMW released an even more hardcore, track focused version of the M5 called the Competition. With 616bhp and a 0-62mph time of just 3.3 seconds, only a learjet could get you across Europe quicker.

Of course, in the rarefied world of super saloons, the Competition soon proved to be more popular than the ‘regular’ M5, so when it came time for a mid-life facelift in 2020, the standard car was dropped from the line up. At first it looked like a controversial move as the M5’s big rival – the Mercedes-AMG E63 – is still available with two power outputs, but you could argue that the addition of the 523bhp M550i xDrive to the regular 5 Series range effectively negates the need for a ‘lesser’ M5. You can read more about that car in our BMW 5 Series saloon review.

As part of that 2020 update, the Competition was also treated to a number of mid-cycle tweaks that were also applied to the rest of the BMW 5 Series range, including a larger grille, a more aggressive bodykit and a new infotainment system, as well as some M-specific revisions. BMW also introduced an ‘Ultimate Pack’ that gives the buyer all the ‘must have’ options in one eye-wateringly expensive hit: carbon ceramic brakes, a carbon engine cover, massaging seats, a more powerful stereo and a raised top speed all feature. 

So, have these changes done enough to prepare the class-leading 5 Series luxury saloon for battle with what can only be described as weapons-grade competition, in the form of the Porsche Panamera Turbo, Mercedes-AMG E63 and Audi RS6? Let’s find out. And don’t forget, even if you’re not in the market for a 190mph super saloon, we can save you a good few quid on your next new car if you use our New Car Buying service.

At a glance

Number of trims1 see more
Available fuel types Which fuel is best for you? petrol
MPG range across all versions25.4 - 25.4
Avaliable doors options4
Warranty3 years / No mileage cap
Company car tax at 20% (min/max)£7,431 / £8,837
Company car tax at 40% (min/max)£14,862 / £17,674

How much is it?

Also consider

Lexus LS

2019 - present

Well equipped and distinctive but too flawed in key areas to r...

Mercedes S-Class

2020 - present

The Mercedes S-Class is a comfortable luxury saloon with...

Audi S8

2020 - present

Crushingly fast yet comfortable and refined. Just do...

Bentley Flying Spur

2019 - present

Fast and beautifully finished inside, but it's pricey and...