BMW M3 2021 front tracking
  • BMW M3 2021 front tracking
  • BMW M3 2021 rear cornering
  • BMW M3 2021 driving seat and dashboard
  • BMW M3 2021 rear seats
  • BMW M3 2021 infotainment controls
  • BMW M3 2021 front
  • BMW M3 2021 right tracking
  • BMW M3 2021 left tracking
  • BMW M3 2021 alloy wheel
  • BMW M3 2021 bonnet badge
  • BMW M3 2021 rear lights
  • BMW M3 2021 infotainment
  • BMW M3 2021 engine
  • BMW M3 2021 front seats
  • BMW M3 2021 front tracking
  • BMW M3 2021 rear cornering
  • BMW M3 2021 driving seat and dashboard
  • BMW M3 2021 rear seats
  • BMW M3 2021 infotainment controls
  • BMW M3 2021 front
  • BMW M3 2021 right tracking
  • BMW M3 2021 left tracking
  • BMW M3 2021 alloy wheel
  • BMW M3 2021 bonnet badge
  • BMW M3 2021 rear lights
  • BMW M3 2021 infotainment
  • BMW M3 2021 engine
  • BMW M3 2021 front seats
What Car?’s M3 deals
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Introduction

What Car? says...

Don’t worry: you aren’t about to read a review of a road that starts in Surrey and snakes its way down to Southampton. In fact, the BMW M3 couldn’t be any more different than the grey and somewhat dreary motorway it shares a name with.

Since the mid-80s, the M3 badge has been worn by the fastest and most exciting versions of BMW’s popular executive saloon, the 3 Series. It’s the same deal with this latest model, except this one’s the most powerful incarnation yet with the firepower to match its archrivals, the Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio and Mercedes C63 AMG

FAQs

  • The BMW M3 doesn’t sell in big enough numbers for it to be included in the What Car? Reliability Surve but it shares a lot of components with the petrol BMW 3 Series saloon, which came third out of 18 cars in the executive car class in 2021. BMW finished 13th out of 30 manufacturers in the brand table – ahead of Tesla (15th), Audi (18th), Volvo (19th) Jaguar (21st) and Mercedes (joint 22nd). Read more here

  • In rear-wheel-drive form, the BMW M3 can officially accelerate from 0-62mph in 3.9sec. The superior traction of the xDrive four-wheel-drive version cuts that to 3.5sec. As with many German performance cars, the M3’s top speed is electronically limited to 155mph. Read more here

  • We prefer the rear-wheel-drive BMW M3 to the faster four-wheel drive version because it’s more agile and entertaining, yet costs less. In some countries, the M3 is sold in standard or Competition form, but UK buyers get only the faster (and more expensive) Competition. Read more here

  • While the BMW M3 hasn’t been crash-tested by the safety experts at Euro NCAP (and is not likely to be), the 3 Series executive car on which it’s based received the maximum five stars when it was assessed in 2019. Read more here

  • Very good. The M3 comes with BMW’s iDrive infotainment system, which is easier to use than all rival set-ups. It has intuitive menus and you can control it using a rotary dial and shortcut buttons as well as by prodding the screen, so it’s far less distracting to use. Read more here

  • The BMW M3 offers the same 380 litres of boot space as the regular 3 Series saloon, which means it can swallow seven carry-on suitcases. There’s currently no Touring estate version, but one is expected to be added to the line-up later. Read more here

At a glance
New car deals
Save up to £2,703
Target Price from £75,848
Save up to £2,703
or from £855pm
Swipe to see used and leasing deals
Leasing deals
From £1,070pm
RRP price range £78,175 - £100,215
Number of trims (see all)2
Number of engines (see all)1
Available fuel types (which is best for you?)petrol
MPG range across all versions 28.2 - 28.8
Available doors options 4
Warranty 3 years / No mileage cap
Company car tax at 20% (min/max) £5,676 / £7,263
Company car tax at 40% (min/max) £11,352 / £14,525
Available colours