Nissan Juke review

Category: Small SUV

Section: Costs & verdict

Available fuel types:petrol
Available colours:
Nissan Juke 2019 infotainment RHD
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  • Nissan Juke 2020 front left cornering RHD
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  • Nissan Juke 2019 dashboard RHD
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  • Nissan Juke 2019 infotainment RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 front seats RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 front right studio RHD
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  • 2020 Nissan Juke side
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  • Nissan Juke 2020 front left cornering RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2020 front left cornering RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 rear right cornering RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 dashboard RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 rear seats RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 infotainment RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 front seats RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 front right studio RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 rear left studio RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 boot open RHD
  • 2020 Nissan Juke side
  • 2020 Nissan Juke front
  • Nissan Juke 2020 front left cornering RHD
RRP £18,600What Car? Target Price from£16,809
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Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2

The Nissan Juke’s starting price looks very reasonable in Visia grade, but even the Acenta trim, which is reasonably equipped, undercuts SE trims on the Skoda Kamiq. As you move up the range, the poshest trims push the price up by many thousands of pounds, launching the Juke into Volkswagen T-Roc territory.

Fuel economy and CO2 emissions are respectable if not class-leading – a Ford Puma with a mild-hybrid engine sets the standard for efficiency among small SUVs. While the Juke is predicted to hold on to its value considerably better than a Citroen C3 Aircross, the Skoda Kamiq and T-Roc are expected to suffer depreciation at a slower pace.

Check out our New Car Buying page not just for the best cash prices, but also for hefty discounts on PCP finance. 

Equipment, options and extras

Even the Nissan Juke's entry-level Visia trim gets you cruise control, air-conditioning and electric windows all round. However, Acenta trim is the lowest trim level we'd suggest going for because of the infotainment visibility upgrades we mentioned earlier in our review. It also gives you alloy wheels.

We reckon N-Connecta makes the most sense, though. The mid-range trim brings a leather-wrapped steering wheel and gearlever, climate control and keyless start. If you want a flashier look, Enigma trim adds to the N-Connecta’s equipment list with 19in alloy wheels, textured stickers on the roof and door mirrors, front foglights and metallic paint.

Tekna and Tekna+ models get 19in alloy wheels, heated front seats, adaptive cruise control and safety aids described in more detail in the Safety and Security section. These top two trims are rather pricey, though.

Nissan Juke 2019 infotainment RHD

Reliability

The new Nissan Juke was too recent to featured in the latest What Car? Reliability Survey, but Nissan as a brand performed woefully. Indeed, the Japanese manufacturer came 27th in the overall league table (of 31 manufacturers).

The Juke comes with a three-year/60,000-mile warranty as standard, although it can be extended at extra cost. That's pretty average, and beaten by Renault and Hyundai with their five-year warranties, and Kia's cover, which stretches to seven years. 

Safety and security

The Nissan Juke gets an overall five stars (out of five) safety rating from Euro NCAP, but the devil is in the detail. We looked into the results more deeply and discovered that, while good, in the adult occupancy test it was found to offer 'marginal' protection in a sideways crash, which gave it a lower score than the Skoda Kamiq. It performed slightly better than the Kamiq in the child occupancy and pedestrian tests, though.

Even entry-level Visia models have automatic emergency braking (AEB) with pedestrian detection, lane departure warning and traffic sign recognition. Meanwhile, range-topping Tekna and Tekna+ versions add blindspot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert (to warn you of cars that are about to cross your path when you’re backing out on to a road).

Emergency assist – a button you can use to directly contact the emergency services – is standard on all versions of the Nissan Juke, as are two Isofix mounting points.

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Overview

The Juke is strong in some key areas, such as interior quality, safety and equipment levels, but there are more rounded choices in the small SUV class. The Skoda Kamiq is one, and noticeably better if you’re looking for space or comfort, while the excellent Ford Puma should be cheaper to run and far more exciting to drive.

  • Strong safety rating and equipment
  • Smart interior
  • Lots of toys on our recommended trim
  • Choppy ride
  • So-so infotainment system
  • Nissan's reliability record

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