Nissan Juke review

Category: Small SUV

Section: Performance & drive

Nissan Juke 2019 rear right cornering RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2020 front left cornering RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 rear right cornering RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 dashboard RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 rear seats RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 front seats RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 infotainment RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 front seats RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 front right studio RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 rear left studio RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 boot open RHD
  • 2020 Nissan Juke side
  • 2020 Nissan Juke front
  • Nissan Juke 2020 front left cornering RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2020 front left cornering RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 rear right cornering RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 dashboard RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 rear seats RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 front seats RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 infotainment RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 front seats RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 front right studio RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 rear left studio RHD
  • Nissan Juke 2019 boot open RHD
  • 2020 Nissan Juke side
  • 2020 Nissan Juke front
  • Nissan Juke 2020 front left cornering RHD
What Car?’s Juke deals
New car deals
Save up to £2,194
Target Price from £17,126
Save up to £2,194
or from £189pm
Swipe to see used and leasing deals
Nearly new deals
From £11,995
Leasing deals
From £171pm
In this section:
  • Engine, 0-60mph and gearbox
  • Suspension and ride comfort
  • Handling
  • Noise and vibration

Performance & drive

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

Engine, 0-60mph and gearbox

The only engine option in the Nissan Juke at the moment is the 112bhp 1.0-litre turbocharged petrol (badged DIG-T 114), which is gutsy enough as long as you keep the revs above 2000rpm. If you work it really hard, it can take the Juke from 0-62mph in 10.7sec.

Equivalent engines in the rival Skoda Kamiq and Volkswagen T-Roc are stronger, but not by a great deal. The mild-hybrid engines in the Ford Puma on the other hand – especially the 1.0 Ecoboost Hybrid (mHEV) 155 – are another matter, and feel quite punchy in comparison.

Nissan Juke 2019 rear right cornering RHD

Handling

Despite its lofty stance, the Nissan Juke doesn’t sway around through tight twists and turns as much as you might imagine, and there's a reasonable amount of grip. That said, it's not that much fun, mainly because there's little connection between you and the road – unlike in the Ford Puma, which is by far the sharpest and most enjoyable small SUV to drive.

The Puma's steering is weightier and more alert, its body control is better over undulating roads and it’s simply more agile and playfully balanced in bends. The Skoda Kamiq and Volkswagen T-Roc are not on the Puma's level, but they too feel more poised than the Nissan Juke.