Toyota Corolla review

Category: Family car

Section: Introduction

Toyota Corolla 2022 front right cornering
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 front right cornering
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 rear right tracking
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 interior dashboard
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 interior rear seats
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 interior infotainment detail
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 right static
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 front right static
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 front end detail
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 rear left static
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 rear detail
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 front right tracking
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 boot open
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 front right cornering
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 rear right tracking
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 interior dashboard
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 interior rear seats
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 interior infotainment detail
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 right static
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 front right static
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 front end detail
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 rear left static
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 rear detail
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 front right tracking
  • Toyota Corolla 2022 boot open
What Car?’s Corolla deals
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Target Price from £25,338
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Introduction

What Car? says...

So, you don’t want a diesel. The petrol cars you’ve looked at aren’t frugal enough and an electric car won’t fit your lifestyle. It’s a common conundrum for the modern car buyer, but before you tear your hair out, there could be an answer: a 'self-charging' hybrid, like the Toyota Corolla.

The Corolla doesn't need to be charged overnight to get the best out of it – you simply treat it like a regular petrol car and let it sort out the electrical business for itself. The battery is topped up when you use the brakes, then a small electric motor is deployed to improve either efficiency or performance. If you're really gentle, you can drive the Corolla on battery power alone for short distances.

Read on over the next few pages of this review and we'll tell you everything you need to know – from what we think of the Corolla's performance on the road to which engine and trim combination we reckon is the best.

By the way, there's also an estate version available offering lots more load-lugging space. To read about that, see our full Toyota Corolla Touring Sports review.

When you're ready to buy a new car of any make and model, we could help you save thousands off the list price if you search our free What Car? New Car Buying service. It's a great place to find the best new family car deals.

FAQs

  • The Toyota Corolla was the seventh best-placed hybrid in our 2021 What Car? Reliability Survey, with a strong overall score in a competitive car class. The Toyota RAV4 was the only higher-placed car made by the marque. Toyota also came a highly respectable joint fifth (with Mini) out of 30 car makers in our overall rankings for cars up to five years old. That’s well ahead of BMW, Mazda and Volkswagen, but a fraction behind Lexus, Dacia, Hyundai and Suzuki. Read more here

  • The Toyota Corolla is only available as a hybrid, with a choice of 1.8 and 2.0-litre engines available with electrical assistance. Toyota was a hybrid pioneer, launching the Toyota Prius in the Nineties, and that tried and tested technology sits at the heart of the Corolla. The Toyota bZ4X is the firm’s first fully electric car. Read more here

  • Our pick is the lower-powered 1.8-litre engine combined with the Icon Tech trim level. The engine is relatively modestly powered but adequate for most situations and very economical. Icon Tech is good value for value for money, adding front and rear parking sensors, a self-parking system and sat-nav, part-digital instruments and steering assist to the base Icon trim. Read more here

  • Icon Tech is our pick of the range for providing the best balance of must-have kit and price. If you really want to go all-out, top-spec Excel is the one to go for. It sits above Design trim (which in turn sits above Icon Tech) and adds keyless entry, ambient interior lighting, sports seats with part-leather upholstery and 18in wheels to its privacy glass, LED foglights, an auto-dimming rear-view mirror and rain-sensing wipers. In our view, Excel makes the Corolla too pricey. Other trims are entry-level Icon and the high-spec, sports-oriented GR Sport. Read more here

  • The Toyota Corolla’s infotainment system is one of the few weak areas in its make-up. It has a complex menu layout, sluggish responses to prods and a relatively low resolution screen featuring some very basic graphics. Sat-nav is standard from Tech Icon upwards. On a positive note, the 8.9in touchscreen is well positioned on the dashboard, making it easy to see and reach. All Corollas get Android Auto and Apple CarPlay as standard so you can mirror your smartphone on the screen (highly desirable given the system’s drawbacks). Read more here

  • If boot space is a priority, beware which engine you choose, because the 2.0-litre engine is larger than the 1.8, requiring its 12-volt battery to be located below the boot floor, eating into its storage capacity. The 1.8’s boot will swallow six carry-on cases, one more than the Volkswagen Golf but less than the Skoda Scala or unusually large Skoda Octavia. If you’re intent on buying a Corolla but need more space, consider the Toyota Corolla Touring Sports estate. Read more here

At a glance
New car deals
Save up to £1,957
Target Price from £25,338
Save up to £1,957
or from £258pm
Swipe to see used and leasing deals
Leasing deals
From £286pm
RRP price range £26,895 - £33,580
Number of trims (see all)5
Number of engines (see all)2
Available fuel types (which is best for you?)hybrid
MPG range across all versions 53.3 - 62.8
Available doors options 5
Warranty 5 years / 100000 miles
Company car tax at 20% (min/max) £1,281 / £1,867
Company car tax at 40% (min/max) £2,561 / £3,735
Available colours