Vauxhall Crossland review

Category: Small SUV

Section: Performance & drive

Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD rear tracking
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD rear tracking
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 interior driver display
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD boot open
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD dashboard interior
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD infotainment
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD front tracking
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD front detail
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD rear detail
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD front right urban
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD rear urban
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 wheel detail
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD rear tracking
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 interior driver display
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD boot open
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD dashboard interior
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD infotainment
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD front tracking
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD front detail
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD rear detail
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD front right urban
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD rear urban
  • Vauxhall Crossland 2021 wheel detail
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In this section:
  • Engine, 0-60mph and gearbox
  • Suspension and ride comfort
  • Handling
  • Noise and vibration

Performance & drive

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

Engine, 0-60mph and gearbox

The Vauxhall Crossland's entry-level non-turbocharged 1.2 (83PS) petrol has a fairly measly 82bhp and takes 14.0sec to get from 0-62mph. We'd advise at least stepping up to the 1.2 (110PS) Turbo, with its more useful 109bhp. It’s the best version of the 1.2 based on cost and performance, and is a willing engine when revved, providing enough punch for most situations. The official 0-62mph time is 10.5sec, which is quicker than the Skoda Kamiq 1.0 TSI 95.

That said, the extra power of the 128bhp 1.2 (130PS) Turbo is welcome. It pulls really well from around 2000rpm, so there's no need to thrash it to get up to speed. It’s the only petrol that’s available with the option of the six-speed automatic gearbox, which is fine, but doesn’t change down as swiftly as a few of the rival autos, including the Volkswagen T-Roc.

The Crossland rides more like the Nissan Juke. It's not uncomfortable, and it absorbs most bumps pretty well, but certain sharper-edged abrasions thud through the cabin, and it's never truly settled on the motorway, unless you're lucky enough to find a dead-smooth section.

If ride quality is a big concern for you, it's best to stick with the smaller 16in wheels fitted to SE Edition models, as larger wheels can make it worse.

Vauxhall Crossland 2021 RHD rear tracking

Handling

If you spend most of your time weaving through urban traffic, the Crossland does a good job. Its light steering makes it easy to nip in and out of lanes and helps with low-speed parking manoeuvres.

When you head out into the countryside and along winding lanes, the steering feels accurate and faithful enough for you to guide the Crossland with relative ease. Sadly, though, with less grip and more body lean than some of its lighter-footed rivals, it's not a whole heap of fun. It's also affected by crosswinds on motorways.

New car deals
Save up to £1,450
Target Price from £18,108
Save up to £1,450
or from £208pm
Swipe to see used and leasing deals
Nearly new deals
From £16,995