Volkswagen ABT e-Transporter 6.1 review

Category: Medium Van

Section: Passenger & boot space

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Volkswagen ABT eTransporter side door opening
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  • Volkswagen ABT eTransporter 6.1 driving
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Passenger & boot space

How it copes with people and clutter

Since they started gaining popularity with the Nissan eNV200 and Renault Kangoo ZE, electric vans have always been great for those who need to transport volume and not weight. That’s because the loadspace is usually completely unchanged from the regular van as batteries are located under the loadspace floor. The e-Transporter is no different, which means that you can carry lengths just under 3m long as well as having space for 6.7cubic metres.

What is impacted is the payload. While many manufacturers have strived to strip as much weight as possible out of their vans to limit the deficit of their electric models compared to the combustion engine equivalents, the best performing e-Transporter model only has a payload of 996kg – more than 300kg less than the best-performing diesel van. The e-Transporter is limited because it comes in just one size, though, with only a single length and one roof height option.

There’s 1410mm of load height from floor to roof available in the van, 1700m across the width and 1244mm between the wheelarches. That’s enough to ensure that three Euro pallets can fit in the back. With a sliding door that also measures 1020mm wide by 1284mm high you can even load a pallet through the side.

Charging electric vans is perhaps the most contentious and important aspect of ownership. If necessary, the e-Transporter can take power onboard pretty quickly, with a 50kW DC charger able – in optimal conditions –  to recharge the 16 cells of the lithium-ion battery in just 45 minutes. On a slower 7kW charging wall box it takes around 5.5 hours to get from zero to 100%.

Volkswagen ABT eTransporter side door opening

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