MG HS review

Category: Large SUV

Section: Costs & verdict

Available fuel types:petrol
Star rating
MG HS 2019 RHD rear seats
  • MG HS front 2019
  • MG HS 2019 front tight tracking shot
  • MG HS 2019 front wide panning
  • MG HS 2019 rear tight tracking
  • MG HS 2019 RHD front seats
  • MG HS 2019 RHD instruments closeup
  • MG HS 2019 RHD boot open
  • MG HS 2019 RHD rear right tracking
  • MG HS 2019 RHD dashboard
  • MG HS 2019 RHD rear seats
  • MG HS 2019 RHD infotainment
  • MG HS front 2019
  • MG HS 2019 front tight tracking shot
  • MG HS 2019 front wide panning
  • MG HS 2019 rear tight tracking
  • MG HS 2019 RHD front seats
  • MG HS 2019 RHD instruments closeup
  • MG HS 2019 RHD boot open
  • MG HS 2019 RHD rear right tracking
  • MG HS 2019 RHD dashboard
  • MG HS 2019 RHD rear seats
  • MG HS 2019 RHD infotainment
RRP £17,995What Car? Target Price from£17,820
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Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

This is where the HS really comes into its own. Despite being a similar size to the Mazda CX-5, the cheapest model undercuts the far smaller Volkswagen T-Roc on price by a considerable margin. Even the top-spec Exclusive model is cheaper than entry-level versions of the Skoda Kodiaq and Peugeot 5008.

The news isn’t as good if you’re looking at finance. When we looked into a three-year PCP on an Exclusive model, it proved pricier than a more expensive Mazda CX-5 or Citroën C5 Aircross by a considerable margin.

All models are well equipped; even base Explore trim gets such niceties as keyless entry and start, automatic headlights, adjustable lumbar support, cruise control and an auto-dimming rear-view mirror. Mid-spec Excite trim increases the alloy wheel size from 17in to 18in, adds rain-sensing wipers and introduces the option of an automatic gearbox. If you want dual-zone climate control, LED headlights and electric leather seats, you’ll need top-spec Exclusive trim. Overall, Excite trim makes the most sense, but given that it only costs a little more, we wouldn’t blame you for picking Exclusive.

If you’re thinking of running an HS as a company car, bear in mind that the engine’s CO2 emissions are on the high side: 148g/km with a manual gearbox and 157g/km with the automatic. However, it’s worth remembering that the HS’s low list price will offset the fact that its benefit-in-kind (BIK) tax bracket is higher than that of rivals such as the 5008. Officially, the HS averages 37.2mpg with the manual ’box and 36.2mpg with the auto; that’s not terrible for the class as a whole but trails the petrol 5008. 

However, despite the official fuel economy figures look disappointing, in our tests the HS manual managed a respectable 33.7mpg; that’s not too far behind the 2.0-litre CX-5 and 1.2-litre Citroën C5 Aircross.

Euro NCAP has yet to test the HS for safety, but all models receive a glut of crash mitigation kit. Automatic emergency braking (AEB), lane-keeping assistance, blindspot monitoring and even a rear cross-traffic alert system are standard on every model in the range, a list previously unheard of at this price point. Opt for the automatic gearbox and you also get adaptive cruise control, complete with a traffic jam assist feature that can steer the car in slow-moving traffic.

MG HS 2019 RHD infotainment
MG HS front 2019
Open Gallery11 Images

Overview

Not only does the MG HS offer excellent value for money, it also has a classy interior and punchy performance if you’re prepared to work the engine for it. Although its infotainment system is laggy and its engine rather coarse when pushed, it’s well worth considering.

  • Cheap yet well equipped
  • Plush interior
  • Good ride and handling balance
  • Small boot
  • Coarse engine
  • Pricey PCP deals