Peugeot 5008 review

Category: Large SUV

Section: Performance & drive

Peugeot 5008 2020 Rear tracking
  • Peugeot 5008 2021 front
  • Peugeot 5008 2020 Rear tracking
  • Peugeot 5008 2020 Dashboard
  • Peugeot 5008 2020 Third row fold-out seats
  • Peugeot 5008 2020 Dashboard
  • Peugeot 5008 2020 Infotainment
  • Peugeot 5008 2020 Left static
  • Peugeot 5008 2020 Grille detail
  • Peugeot 5008 2020 Rear light detail
  • Peugeot 5008 2021 front
  • Peugeot 5008 2020 Rear tracking
  • Peugeot 5008 2020 Dashboard
  • Peugeot 5008 2020 Third row fold-out seats
  • Peugeot 5008 2020 Dashboard
  • Peugeot 5008 2020 Infotainment
  • Peugeot 5008 2020 Left static
  • Peugeot 5008 2020 Grille detail
  • Peugeot 5008 2020 Rear light detail
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In this section:
  • Engine, 0-60mph and gearbox
  • Suspension and ride comfort
  • Handling
  • Noise and vibration

Performance & drive

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

Engine, 0-60mph and gearbox

You might be suspicious that Peugeot 5008's 129bhp 1.2-litre engine (badged Puretech 130) is too small to power a seven-seat SUV adequately. Well, you can relax; it’s eager to rev and packs enough punch for most people's performance needs. It takes 9.9sec to get from 0-62mph and, with plentiful low-down shove, it feels far stronger on the road than those numbers suggest. With that in mind, it’s our pick of the range.

You can have the Puretech 130 with a six-speed manual or an eight-speed automatic gearbox, but the more powerful 179bhp 1.6-litre petrol (Puretech 180) comes as an auto only and in the higher trim levels. Unsurprisingly, this engine makes the 5008 a fair bit brisker, managing 0-62mph in 8.3sec: similar to the pace on offer in a Kia Sorento 1.6 T-GDi.

Suspension and ride comfort

The relatively softly sprung but still well-controlled ride is up there with the Sorento, making the 5008 one of the more comfortable cars in the class. If you stick to 17 or 18in alloy wheels it has more 'give' overall but the roughest urban roads than the ever-jiggly Nissan X-Trail, only thumping if you encounter a particularly gargantuan pothole.

It's also far calmer at motorway speeds than the stiffly sprung Tarraco and even has the edge over the generally comfy Kodiaq. If you’re after a very restful long-distance machine, only the Citroën C5 Aircross betters it for high-speed waft, unless you start looking at more expensive premium models, such as the Audi Q5 with air suspension.

Noise and vibration

At motorway speeds, the 5008 is enjoyably quiet. It produces less wind noise than the Kodiaq and less road roar than the Sorento. Only when you hit a really worn, coarse section of asphalt do the tyres emit a noticeable drone; the 19in wheels are worse for this than the smaller wheel options.