Best new car discounts: July 2024

Want to save big money on your next car? Well, you can get almost 18% off the list price with our Target Price discounts, available on everything from estates to SUVs...

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by
George Hill
Published17 July 2024

If you're worried about negotiating a discount on your next new car, then fear not – our monthly Target Price deals are here to help.

Target Price is unique to What Car? and represents the most we think you should pay for any given car. Our team spends all day haggling with car makers on your behalf, and the best prices they can achieve are printed online and in What Car? magazine.

Nissan Juke with Target Price logo

Most of the dealers on our free New Car Deals platform will match Target Price, and if they don't, we'll highlight it to them and to you. In some cases, you could save even more than the Target Price, so it's always worth checking.

Here, we're highlighting the 10 best Target Price savings for July by percentage – so if you're looking to save a bundle on your next car, read on. 

Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Smart interior
  • Decent to drive
  • Well equipped

Weaknesses

  • Expensive
  • Cramped in the back
  • Driving position won’t suit everyone

Model 51kWh Active | List price £32,000 | Target Price £26,257 | Saving £5743 | Percentage discount 17.9%

One factor that has limited the e-208's appeal has been its steep list price. However, our Target Price discount brings the cost down significantly, making this small electric car much better value than before. Its key strengths include a smart, high-quality interior and a comfortable ride, as well as a generous standard kit list. Indeed, the entry-level Active trim maximises the car's value, offering LED headlights, automatic windscreen wipers and a 10.0in touchscreen as standard. Thankfully, a recent update and a larger 48.1kWh (usable) battery has improved the car's official range, lifting the number to 248 miles. That's farther than an MG4 SE can travel.

Read our in-depth Peugeot e-208 review

Our pick: 2.0 B5P [250] Core 5dr AWD Geartronic

0-62mph: 7.7 sec
MPG/range: 33.6mpg
CO2 emissions: 190g/km
Seats: 7
Boot: 302 litres
Insurance group: 37E
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Classy interior
  • Seven seats come as standard
  • Plug-in hybrid option

Weaknesses

  • Road and suspension noise
  • Rivals offer a more comfortable ride
  • Fiddly infotainment system

Model 2.0 B5P Core | List price £61,670 | Target Price £52,669 | Saving £9001 | Percentage discount 14.6%

The second-generation XC90 has been around for a number of years now, but it continues to be a stylish and comfortable seven-seater. As is the case with most new Volvos, the interior is filled with high-quality materials, including a plethora of leather and chrome. You also get loads of kit as standard, particularly with this entry-level Core trim, which includes leather seats (heated in the front and outer middle row), a heated windscreen, a heated steering wheel, a powered tailgate and four-zone climate control as standard. With our Target Price discount factored in, it's very well priced, too.

Read our in-depth Volvo XC90 review

Our pick: 115kW La Prima 54kWh 5dr Auto

0-62mph: 9 sec
CO2 emissions: 0g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 360 litres
Insurance group: 26E
Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Cheaper than its main rivals
  • Relatively fast charging speed
  • Comfortable low-speed ride

Weaknesses

  • Relatively noisy on motorways
  • Tight rear leg room
  • Interior would benefit from higher quality materials

Model La Prima | List price £36,995 | Target Price £32,910 | Saving £4085 | Percentage discount 11%

If you like the idea of a Fiat 500 Electric, but want a bit more interior space, then the Fiat 600e is your next best option. It offers similar retro styling, but with useable back seats and a decent-sized boot. Like its smaller sibling, the 600e feels most at home in urban environments, where its light steering and relatively tight turning circle make it easy to drive. Unlike its sibling, it does have a more useable official range of 254 miles, which means you can venture much farther out of town. A Smart #1 Premium can travel slightly farther, though.

Read our in-depth Fiat 600e review

Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Competent engines
  • Spacious interior and boot
  • Stable and easygoing dynamics

Weaknesses

  • More expensive than some rivals
  • Some fundamental functions are buried in the touchscreen
  • Slightly choppy low speed ride on standard suspension

Model 1.5 eTSI Life | List price £38,500 | Target Price £34,428 | Saving £4072 | Percentage discount 10.6%

Volkswagen has recently launched a new Passat, and you can already get a big discount on one. Unlike previous versions, the new model is only offered as an estate, but this is no bad thing because the boot is enormous. In fact, it’s one of the biggest in the class, beating both the Audi A6 Avant and Mercedes E-Class Estate for size. The version quoted here is the entry-level car, which means it's powered by a 148bhp mild hybrid petrol engine that offers plenty of poke for everyday driving, with a 0-62mph time of 9.2 seconds.

Read our in-depth Volkswagen Passat review

Our pick: 1.0 DiG-T N-Connecta 5dr

0-62mph: 10.7 sec
MPG/range: 48.7mpg
CO2 emissions: 133g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 422 litres
Insurance group: 13E
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Smart interior
  • Good safety rating
  • Lots of toys on our recommended trim

Weaknesses

  • Choppy ride
  • So-so infotainment system
  • Hybrid isn't as fuel efficient as a Toyota Yaris Cross

Model 1.0 DiG-T N-Connecta | List price £25,500 | Target Price £22,865 | Saving £2635 | Percentage discount 10.3%

The Juke has long been a big-seller in the UK, and this second-generation version is no exception to that. It offers distinctive styling, a smart interior and plenty of standard kit to tempt you in. There's also a choice of petrol or hybrid engines, although we think the petrol engine is the better option. It offers reasonably low running costs and a similar level of performance to the hybrid, but without pushing up the price. It's worth noting there are more practical alternatives out there, including the Ford Puma and VW T-Roc.

Read our in-depth Nissan Juke review

Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Competitively priced
  • Plush ride
  • Upmarket interior

Weaknesses

  • Roly-poly handling
  • Boot could be larger
  • PHEV sits in a higher tax band than some rivals

Model 1.2 PureTech 130 You | List price £29,440 | Target Price £27,100 | Saving £2340 | Percentage discount 7.9%

The C5 X is exceptional value, especially when you consider its spacious, high-quality interior and comfortable ride. All versions get Citroën's 'Progressive Hydraulic Cushions' for the suspension and plug-in hybrid models add active dampers. With the 19in wheels fitted on You trim, the C5 X glides over minor road imperfections and does a good job of cushioning you from ruts and potholes. The 128bhp 1.2-litre petrol engine is small, but provides a surprising amount of shove when accelerating. 

Read our in-depth Citroën C5 X review

Our pick: 2.0 e-Skyactiv G MHEV Centre-Line 5dr

0-62mph: 10.7 sec
MPG/range: 43.5mpg
CO2 emissions: 146g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 522 litres
Insurance group: 17E
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Classy interior
  • Tidy handling
  • Very well equipped

Weaknesses

  • Overly firm ride
  • No seven-seat option
  • Rivals have more space for passengers and luggage

Model 2.0 e-Skyactiv G MHEV Centre-Line | List price £31,060 | Target Price £29,062 | Saving £1998 | Percentage discount 6.4%

The CX-5 ticks many of the right family SUV boxes, because it’s good to drive, practical and well made. All versions are well equipped, too; Centre-Line comes with adaptive cruise control and a 10.25in infotainment screen as standard. In terms of engines, we think the 163bhp 2.0-litre petrol unit is the best match for the CX-5. It's not particularly punchy low down in the rev range (it doesn't have a turbocharger), but it does provide enough power for everyday driving. It's also more efficient than the larger 191bhp 2.5-litre petrol unit.

Read our in-depth Mazda CX-5 review

Our pick: 1.0 EcoBoost Hybrid mHEV Titanium 5dr

0-62mph: 10.2 sec
MPG/range: 54.3mpg
CO2 emissions: 118g/km
Seats: 5
Insurance group: 15E
Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Well equipped
  • Great driving position
  • Even more fun with the grippy Track Pack

Weaknesses

  • Infotainment system can be fiddly to use
  • Interior is a bit low rent
  • Steering is inconsistently weighted

Model 2.3 EcoBoost ST | List price £37,705 | Target Price £35,315 | Saving £2390 | Percentage discount 6.3%

If you're looking for a hot hatch with a manual gearbox, the Focus ST is one of few cars left you can buy new. It combines a punchy 276bhp 2.3-litre engine with a slick six-speed manual ‘box, both of which add an element of fun to the driving experience, simply because you're more engaged by shifting gears yourself. Along with that, the Focus ST is very well equipped; all versions come with keyless entry, dual-zone climate control, heated front seats and a heated steering wheel as standard.

Read our in-depth Ford Focus ST review

Our pick: 40 TFSI e Sport 5dr S Tronic

0-62mph: 7.6 sec
MPG/range: 256.8mpg
CO2 emissions: 26g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 280 litres
Insurance group: 24E
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Sharp handling
  • Excellent driving position
  • Strong and frugal engines

Weaknesses

  • Audi's unimpressive reliability record
  • Fiddly infotainment system
  • Plug-in hybrid is currently off-sale

Model 35 TFSI Sport | List price £30,530 | Target Price £29,056 | Saving £1474 | Percentage discount 4.8%

Audi has recently revised the A3, giving it an updated exterior design and a plusher interior. As before, it’s comfortable and practical, plus it has an impressive line-up of engines. Our favourite is the 148bhp 1.5-litre petrol, badged 35 TFSI; it pulls very strongly, plus it helps keep the price down. We recommend going for the entry-level Sport trim over S line, because the smaller wheels and softer suspension set-up improve the ride quality. It's very well equipped, too, with three-zone air conditioning and heated front seats offered as standard.

Read our in-depth Audi A3 review

Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Cheap yet very well equipped
  • Plush interior for the price
  • Good ride and handling balance

Weaknesses

  • Small boot by class standards
  • Coarse engine
  • Laggy infotainment system

Model 1.5 T-GDI PHEV SE | List price £31,095 | Target Price £29,944 | Saving £1151 | Percentage discount 3.7%

The HS offers a lot of car for the money, especially considering its classy, spacious interior and tidy driving manners. While the plug-in hybrid (PHEV) version doesn't have a particularly long official electric-only range (32 miles), it is surprisingly quick, providing an official 0-62mph time of 7.1sec. The entry-level SE is well equipped, too, offering keyless entry and start, rain sensing wipers and adaptive cruise control as standard. Going for the PHEV gives you extra goodies on top, including heated front seats and a 360-degree parking camera.

Read our in-depth MG HS review

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FAQs

What is the cheapest month to buy a new car?

Generally speaking, discounts are at their highest in January and February, since these are typically slow months for new car sales, meaning car makers will offer larger discounts to tempt buyers through the door.

Depending on what sort of car you're looking for, though, the answer could change. If you're in the market for a convertible, for example, you could save more by buying one out of season, in the winter.

It's also worth keeping an eye on March and September, since these months are when the number plates given to new cars update – and some car makers will offer discounts related to getting the 'new registration'.

What is the cheapest way to buy a new car in the UK?

You can buy a new car with cash, by leasing, by using hire-purchase or on a PCP finance deal. Which version is best for you will ultimately depend on your individual circumstances, but there's a good reason why more than 80% of new car sales in the UK are made using PCP – doing so gets you into a new car for a low monthly price.

PCP works by only making the buyer finance a proportion of the car's total value – in this case, the value it's likely to lose during the duration of your contract. At the end of your PCP agreement, you can opt to buy the rest of your car outright, or you can hand it back to the dealer and take out a new contract.

What cars are offering zero percent financing?

Car manufacturers regularly rotate their best offers, making it hard to pinpoint those car makers who regularly offer such deals. They're tempting, though – a 0% finance deal can save you thousands over the cost of a typical four-year contract.

What is the best day to buy a new car?

This is tricky to narrow down, but Fridays are generally good bets for high discounts – especially if you're also timing your purchase to coincide with the end of the month, or the end of a sales quarter. Typically speaking, dealers will be happy to offer larger discounts if it helps them to meet their sales target.

Conversely, since Saturday and Sundays typically yield the highest footfall for dealers thanks to weekend buyers, these typically aren't the best days to go searching for a higher-than-average new car discount.