Hyundai Tucson review

Category: Family SUV

Section: Costs & verdict

Available fuel types:petrol, hybrid
Available colours:
Hyundai Tucson 2021 infotainment
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RRP £28,710What Car? Target Price from£27,128
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Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2

As we mentioned earlier, the Tucson comes with plenty of kit as standard, but you pay for this privilege; it commands a higher starting price than such rivals as the Seat Ateca, Skoda Karoq, Volkswagen Tiguan and Volvo XC40. Meanwhile, the upper trim levels push the Tucson into the premium territory occupied by the BMW X1 and Range Rover Evoque and it doesn’t hold onto its value as well as the Evoque does.

Company car drivers looking for the lowest possible CO2 figures would be best to wait for the plug-in hybrid Tucson that will be joining the range in the not too distant future. However, for private buyers, the 1.6 T-GDi 230 Hybrid version produces as little as 127g/km (although, this does vary depending on spec) putting it in a reasonable benefit-in-kind (BIK) bracket – for reference, a 1.0 TSI Seat Ateca emits 139g/km. The MHEV automatic isn’t bad at 144g/km, either.

The 1.6 T-GDi 230 Hybrid is pretty parsimonious, clocking up 49.6mpg according to official figures  – we managed just over 40mpg in a real-world test. That’s not as good as some diesels in the family SUV class, but it compares well with a lot of the petrols. The MHEV isn’t quite as frugal, but mid to high thirties MPG is easily achievable if the trip computer is to be believed.

Equipment, options and extras

As we’ve already mentioned, entry-level SE Connect models come generously equipped with 17in alloy wheels, dual-zone climate control and cruise control,  plus the driver-side electrically adjustable lumbar support and infotainment system that we discussed in their respective sections.

If you want a few more goodies it’s well worth taking a look at Premium trim. A relatively small jump up in price gives you niceties that include larger 18in wheels (19in on Hybrid Premium models), a black two-tone roof, adaptive cruise control, an eight-speaker Krell premium sound system and additional safety features (see the safety section for more information). 

Luxurious range-topping Ultimate trim completes the line-up with 19in alloy wheels, a panoramic sunroof, three-zone climate control, an electric tailgate and much more besides. However, this pushes the Tucson’s list price worryingly close to the plusher Volvo XC40 and Range Rover Evoque.

Hyundai Tucson 2021 infotainment

Reliability

Hyundai is one of the more reliable brands, finishing 6th out of 31 in our 2020 What Car? Reliability Survey. That’s one place below Skoda but above many other makers of family SUVs, including Audi, BMW, Seat, Volvo and Volkswagen. If you’re contemplating a Range Rover Evoque, Land Rover finished plum last.

You get a five-year, unlimited-mileage warranty with the Tucson. That’s better than most rivals offer with the exception of Kia, which covers you for up to seven years.

Safety and security

 

Euro NCAP hasn’t tested the latest Tucson but it does come as standard with plenty of safety kit that’s designed to stop you from getting into an accident in the first place. For example, every Tucson comes with automatic emergency braking, a driver attention warning system, speed limit recognition, trailer stability assist, and a system that will automatically apply the brakes after a collision to ensure you don’t roll forwards and have a secondary impact. Clever. 

Stepping up to Premium trim adds to the standard car’s already impressive safety equipment list list with a blind spot warning system and rear-cross traffic alert, while range-topping Ultimate models get a Highway Drive Assist feature that adjusts your steering for you in order to keep the car centered in your chosen lane – although you must keep your hands on the wheel.

Overview

If interior space is high on your list of priorities you should definitely take a look at the Tucson. A quartet of tall adults will have plenty of room and the boot is cavernous. Interior quality impresses, as it should given the Tucson’s relatively high asking price. However, there are more comfortable and better handling SUVs out there, while premium rivals such as the Range Rover Evoque feel even more special inside.

  • Frugal hybrid is a worthy alternative to diesel
  • Well-made interior
  • Spacious for passengers and luggage
  • So-so handling
  • Ride can get choppy at times
  • No NCAP rating as yet

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