Jeep Avenger review

Category: Small SUV

The Avenger's competitive price and smart interior make it an attractive small SUV choice

Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid front right driving
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid front right driving
  • Lawrence Cheung test driving Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid boot open
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid interior infotainment
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid front driving
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid front left driving
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid front right driving off road
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid rear left driving
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid front left static
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid left static
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid alloy wheel
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid rear lights detail
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid interior dashboard
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid interior front seats
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid interior back seats
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid interior detail
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid front right driving
  • Lawrence Cheung test driving Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid boot open
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid interior infotainment
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid front driving
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid front left driving
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid front right driving off road
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid rear left driving
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid front left static
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid left static
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid alloy wheel
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid rear lights detail
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid interior dashboard
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid interior front seats
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid interior back seats
  • Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid interior detail
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Introduction

What Car? says...

If we were to liken Jeep’s range of cars to cooking appliances, the Jeep Avenger is the equivalent of an air fryer. It’s small, compact and far easier to live with than the traditional (perhaps conventional oven-like) Wrangler.

Indeed, with dinky dimensions and underpinnings shared with the Peugeot 2008 and Vauxhall Mokka, the Avenger is the most car-like Jeep on sale today. That might not sound particularly appealing to existing fans of Jeeps, but it could tempt new buyers who’ve always fancied one but don't want anything too off-roady.

There’s a simple range of two petrol engines, including an e-Hybrid version that’s meant to bridge the gap between the entry-level petrol unit and the Jeep Avenger Electric (which we've reviewed separately).

Three trim levels are available and they're keenly priced to tempt you away from the main rivals – which include the Ford Puma, Nissan Juke and Skoda Kamiq

So, can the Jeep Avenger compete with the best small SUVs and would we recommend buying one? Read on to find out...

Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid rear driving

Overview

There are bigger and more practical small SUVs around, but if rear seat space isn’t a priority, the Jeep Avenger’s sensible price tag and smart interior make it an appealing choice. The lower trim levels represent the best value, while the e-Hybrid is a well-rounded option.

  • Good driving position
  • Competitively priced
  • Small dimensions benefit manoeuvrability
  • Tight rear leg room
  • Scratchy interior plastics
  • Engine range is limited
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Jeep Avenger 115kW Altitude 54kWh 5dr Auto review
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Performance & drive

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

The entry-level engine in the Jeep Avenger produces 99bhp from a 1.2-litre petrol unit. Acceleration is good, with a reasonable amount of low-down shove to help it feel gutsy enough around town speeds.

Combined with a six-speed manual gearbox that slots into gear smoothly and has a short throw, this Avenger offers a simple level of fun in everyday driving.

For a little more money, there’s the e-Hybrid version, which combines the 1.2-litre petrol engine with mild-hybrid technology to bolster fuel economy and performance. Power remains at 99bhp and with a 0-62mph time of 10.9 seconds, the e-Hybrid’s on-paper performance figures don’t look particularly punchy. 

Even so, there’s plenty of muscle for everyday driving, with the electric motor helping to deliver an even spread of pulling power throughout the rev range.

The standard-fit six-speed automatic gearbox will change down a gear quickly enough when you need a burst of acceleration. It’s far more responsive than the eight-speed automatic you get in the Peugeot 2008 and Citroën C4 with the regular (non-hybrid) version of the 1.2-litre engine.

There are quicker rivals, though. An equivalent 2008 e-Hybrid produces 134bhp and takes 8.3 seconds to get from 0-62mph, while a Ford Puma 125 automatic takes 9.6 seconds to complete the same sprint. 

If you want the fastest Avenger, the 154bhp Electric version, with its 9.0 seconds 0-62mph time, is currently the one to get. A four-wheel drive 4xe version benefitting from an extra electric motor on the rear axle is arriving later.

Jeep AVENGER image
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The e-Hybrid’s party piece is that it can cover very short distances on electric power with its 0.9kWh battery – something few mild hybrids can do.

Jeep reckons you can cover more than half a mile at a time on electric power in the e-Hybrid at speeds below 20mph. In our experience, the electric motor works best when driven on a flat section of road (or downhill) with the driver’s foot gently pressing on the accelerator pedal. Ask for any more performance and you will trigger the petrol engine. 

In short, a Lexus LBX or Toyota Yaris Cross with their regular hybrid systems will frequently spend more time on pure electric power at low speeds and prove more economical on fuel, but as mild hybrid systems go the Avenger's is impressive.

Refinement is generally good. There’s a little wind noise at motorway speeds, while road noise is moderate. The stop-start system doesn’t activate as quickly or as smoothly as in a mild-hybrid Puma though, and you feel some vibration from the floor during acceleration.

However, the e-Hybrid's petrol engine is still smoother and more hushed than the regular 1.2-litre engine used in many of the Avenger’s stablemates. The brake pedal response is also much more consistent than it is in a Peugeot 2008, making it much easier to stop the car smoothly.

The e-Hybrid benefits from regenerative braking to recover some energy after you lift off the accelerator pedal. It helps recharge the battery, and while you can’t adjust the strength of it, it's strong enough at town speeds to help reduce how often you need to use the brake pedal.

Otherwise, the Avenger continues to feel most at home in urban environments, where its small dimensions and relatively tight turning circle make it a doddle to drive. While switching into Sport drive mode makes very little difference to the light steering, its accurate response still inspires enough confidence when it’s time to thread the Avenger through a series of turns and bends. 

This is not a sporty SUV though. A Puma grips harder, leans less and is much sharper to drive. Ultimately the Avenger puts comfort ahead of dynamics, with the upside being a car that is far more comfortable than a Puma and much calmer than the taller-bodied Jeep Renegade

All versions come with Hill Descent Control, which uses the brakes to manage downhill speeds without the driver having to touch the pedals. There are also Sand, Snow and Mud drive modes available to maximise traction, while the Avenger has 200mm of ground clearance. It certainly had little trouble dealing with a small muddy track when we took it off road.

Driving overview

Strengths Comfortable ride and handling balance; relatively quiet cruiser

Weaknesses Light steering doesn’t inspire much confidence; there are faster rivals out there

Lawrence Cheung test driving Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid

Interior

The interior layout, fit and finish

The Jeep Avenger’s interior is a perfectly pleasant place to spend time, with a simple design that’s dressed with a big slab of trim finisher in higher-spec models to brighten the mood.

Despite being constructed of hard and scratchy plastics, it looks easier on the eye and more uplifting than many rivals, such as the rather plain and gloomy Ford Puma or Toyota Yaris Cross. That said, there are plusher alternatives around, including the Lexus LBX, Peugeot 2008, and VW T-Roc.

The e-Hybrid gains gearshift paddles mounted on the back of the steering wheel and a D/M logo on the gear selector (rather than D) over the Electric variant. 

A 7.0in digital driver's display is fitted to entry-level Longitude trim, while mid-spec Altitude trim and above has a larger 10.3in one that offers a wide range of layouts. On the e-Hybrid, the text of the speedometer readout turns blue when you're running on electric power as a very simple visual indicator. 

Forward visibility is mostly impressive, thanks to the relatively tall side windows and thin front window pillars. However, the view over your shoulder isn’t quite as impressive, due to wide rear window pillars. At least rear parking sensors come as standard on all versions to make parking a doddle, while all-round sensors and a rear-view camera is fitted to top-spec Summit.

With lots of adjustment in the seat and steering wheel, you’ll find it easy to get comfortable behind the wheel. The only disappointment is that adjustable lumbar support in the driver's seat is optional on all versions of the Avenger (you do get a massaging function with it though). 

A 10.3in touchscreen infotainment system is standard and is positioned high up in the dashboard to make it fairly easy to glance across at while driving. It’s also easy to use, with an intuitive operating system and quick responses to prods.

You have to pay extra for built-in sat-nav on all Avengers, but we wouldn’t bother because you get wireless Android Auto and Apple CarPlay. That means you can sync up your phone and run navigation apps through the screen instead.

Thankfully, there’s also a row of physical buttons for the climate controls, which makes it easy to adjust the temperature while driving. While the rotary dials in the Ford Puma and Nissan Juke are even easier to use, the Avenger’s layout is far less distracting to use on the move than the touchscreen-based system in the 2008.

Interior overview

Strengths Cheery design; responsive infotainment system; physical climate controls

Weaknesses Too many hard and scratchy plastics

Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid boot open

Passenger & boot space

How it copes with people and clutter

Even by small SUV standards, the Jeep Avenger is dinky, so it's not the most practical model in the class. Still, space in the front is impressive and there’s lots of head and leg room, so a pair of six-footers will easily get comfortable. 

There’s plenty of storage space in the front, including a big cubby (with a magnetic lid) at the bottom of the dashboard, a couple of cupholders and a cubby beneath the centre armrest. There’s also a long storage tray running across the dash below the air vents, but it can result in smaller items sliding around when cornering, so it’s not all that useful.

Where the Avenger comes up a little short is in the rear seats, where space is tight. Your 6ft friends will fit, with just enough head room and space to tuck their feet underneath the front seats. Their knees will be wedged up against the seats in front of them, though. There’s also no storage space at all. A Skoda Kamiq or VW T-Roc is far more accommodating.

The Avenger has a 380-litre boot capacity, which trails the Ford Puma, Peugeot 2008 and Kamiq but should be enough for a weekend trip away for a family. The e-Hybrid comes with a height-adjustable boot floor in mid-level Altitude trim and above. In its highest setting, there is a useful storage area underneath and it reduces the height of the load lip at the entrance.

The rear seatbacks split and fold in a 60/40 format when you need to make extra room, which is par for the course in this class. However, you don’t get a sliding rear bench (as you do in a VW T-Cross) or a ski hatch to thread longer items through in between to rear occupants (like in a VW T-Roc).

Practicality overview

Strengths Spacious for those sitting up front; impressive front storage space

Weaknesses Tight rear seat space; average-sized boot

Jeep Avenger e-Hybrid interior infotainment

Buying & owning

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

The Jeep Avenger’s entry-level list price undercuts the Peugeot 2008, Skoda Kamiq and Vauxhall Mokka by a small amount, while a Ford Puma is significantly pricier. You’ll have to pay slightly more for the e-Hybrid, which you can identify by its green "e" badge on the boot (the Jeep Avenger Electric has a blue one), but it’s your only option if you must have your Avenger with an automatic gearbox. 

Arguably, the Avenger Electric is a better choice as a car to use around towns and cities, with its immediate, muscular power delivery making stop-start driving even more effortless. However, it’s going to take a long time for any buyer to recoup the extra £9,000 they've spent to buy one on fuel savings over the e-Hybrid.

The Avenger is predicted to lose its value more slowly than all its rivals, including the Puma, 2008, Kamiq and Mokka, so that should lead to attractive monthly payments if you buy one on a PCP finance deal. You can check for the latest offers using our New Car Deals pages.

Entry-level Longitude trim comes with 16in alloy wheels, air conditioning, cruise control, automatic windscreen wipers and keyless entry. We’d be tempted to choose this trim level before selecting one of the option packs available, so you can add luxuries you want without stepping up to the next trim level.

Upgrading to mid-rung Altitude will get you a slightly smarter interior (with additional silver trim finishers), a faux-leather steering wheel, bigger (17in) alloys, adaptive cruise control and climate control.

Range-topping Summit is limited to the e-Hybrid version and adds 18in wheels, rear privacy glass, heated front seats, a wireless phone-charging pad and a powered tailgate.

Neither Jeep nor the Avenger feature in the 2023 What Car? Reliability Survey but Jeep finished last out of 32 manufacturers when ranked in the 2022 survey.

There was no Euro NCAP safety rating for the model at the time writing, but it comes with plenty of safety aids, including automatic emergency braking (AEB) with cyclist and pedestrian detection, lane-keeping assist, traffic-sign recognition and driver attention monitor.

Costs overview

Strengths Competitive pricing; plenty of equipment and options; strong resale values

Weaknesses Jeep's questionable reliability performance


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FAQs

  • The Avenger is priced slightly less than most of its rivals. The electric version will cost about £9,000 more. You can check the latest prices on our New Car Deals pages.

  • The Avenger is built on the Stellantis Group's eCMP platform, which also underpins the DS 3, the Peugeot 2008 and the Vauxhall Mokka.

  • The Avenger has 200mm of ground clearance, which is impressive by the standards of small SUVs.

  • The Avenger is built at the Stellantis group's factory in Tychy, Poland.

At a glance
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From £20,995
RRP price range £23,859 - £38,899
Number of trims (see all)3
Number of engines (see all)2
Available fuel types (which is best for you?)electric, petrol
MPG range across all versions 48.7 - 57.6
Available doors options 5
Warranty 3 years / No mileage cap
Company car tax at 20% (min/max) £70 / £1,646
Company car tax at 40% (min/max) £140 / £3,292
Available colours