Range Rover Evoque review

Category: Family SUV

Section: Costs & verdict

Range Rover Evoque 2020 gear selector
  • Range Rover Evoque 2020 front
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 rear tracking
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 dashboard
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 rear seats
  • Range Rover Evoque 2020 gear selector
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 head-on tracking
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 left panning
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 right rear panning
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 wide static
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 front seats
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 boot open
  • Range Rover Evoque 2020 front
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 rear tracking
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 dashboard
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 rear seats
  • Range Rover Evoque 2020 gear selector
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 head-on tracking
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 left panning
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 right rear panning
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 wide static
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 front seats
  • Range Rover Evoque 2021 boot open
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In this section:
  • Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2
  • Equipment, options and extras
  • Reliability
  • Safety and security

Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2

Perhaps the biggest reason to buy a Ranger Rover Evoque (other than the way it looks, of course) is how well it’s likely to hold on to its value. Our depreciation experts expect it to be worth more than any of its rivals – including the Audi Q3 and Volvo XC40 – when you come to sell in three years’ time.

You can find out what your car really does to the gallon with our True MPG Calculator

Equipment, options and extras

Every Range Rover Evoque is well-equipped, with 17in alloy wheels, climate control, rain-sensing wipers, automatic LED headlights, keyless start, power-folding door mirrors and heated front seats fitted even to the cheapest version. Unless you go for range-topping Autobiography trim, you’ll still likely dip into the options list.

S trim gets larger (18in) alloys (and R-Dynamic S trim is identical apart from different 18in alloys), along with the heated, 12-way electrically adjustable front seats we mentioned earlier, leather upholstery and rear animated directional indicators. This trim is our pick for the best value-to-toys ratio.

R-Dynamic SE trim is also worth considering, adding an electric tailgate, automatic high-beam assist for the headlights and blind-spot assist (see the Safety and Security section). Range-topping Autobiography trim is luxurious but very expensive.

Overview

It may well be the Range Rover Evoque’s looks that piqued your interest, but it’s a fine car on more objective levels, too. It’s good to drive, really posh inside and is even reasonably practical by class standards. It’s one of the more expensive cars in the class, but slow depreciation means you should get a lot of that investment back when you sell – and monthly PCP finance costs are also surprisingly competitive. The icing on the cake is a plug-in version that offers seriously cheap company car costs.

  • Great driving position
  • Well-equipped
  • Slow depreciation
  • There are cheaper alternatives
  • So-so fuel economy and emissions
  • Land Rover’s reliability record