Most and least reliable large SUVs

Large and luxury SUVs are bought by families, so reliability is a vital consideration. We reveal the most – and least – dependable models...

Most and least reliable large SUVs

Large SUVs are relied on by parents to take the strain out of the school run and to ferry children to all sorts of clubs and activities. So, as well as sturdy interiors and large boots, they need to be reliable. That's where the What Car? Reliability Survey can help.

We asked more than 18,000 people to tell us about any faults that their cars had suffered during the past 12 months, how long the problem kept the car off the road and how much they'd had to pay to get it fixed.

Those that had the fewest problems and were cheapest to fix gained the top ratings in the study, while those that languished in workshops for days on end and racked up expensive repair bills were given the lowest scores.

Here we name the most and least dependable large SUVs aged up to five years old. We're currently running our reliability survey again, so once you’ve read the story, please tell us about your own car

Top 10 best large SUVs for reliability

10. Volvo XC60 (2008-2017)

Used cars of the week: Volvo XC60 SUV rivals from 9k

Score 95.3%

Only 17% of previous-generation XC60s suffered a fault, the most commonly cited areas being the bodywork, engine electrics and exhaust system. There were also a very small number of reports of issues with the aircon, brakes, engine, fuel system, interior trim and non-engine electrics. 

The majority of cars were put right the same day and about half of the repairs were done under warranty; only a small percentage of owners had to pay up to £1500. 

See how much you could save on a new Volvo XC60 >>


=8. Audi Q5 (2017-present)

Audi Q5 driving

Score 95.4%

Although 26% of Q5 owners reported a fault, the majority of issues were minor, relating to the interior trim and non-engine electrics. There were also some reports of problems with the braking system. 

All cars could still be driven and most were put right in less than a week. All work was carried out under warranty. 

See how much you could save on an Audi Q5 >>


=8. Ford Kuga (2013-2020)

New Mazda CX-5 & Ford Kuga vs Skoda Kodiaq

Score 94.5%

Owners told us 18% of Kugas had suffered a problem; non-engine electrical systems were the main culprit, followed by the battery, brakes, engine electrics and gearbox. 

All cars could still be driven and most were sorted out in a day or less. More than half of the necessary work was carried out for free; owners who did contribute paid between £51 and £750. 

See how much you could save on a new Ford Kuga >>


7. Subaru Forester (2013-present)

Subaru Forester

Score 95.6%

Only 15% of Foresters went wrong, the only areas concerned being the air conditioning, battery and non-engine electrics. All cars could still be driven, but many took more than a week to repair. All work was carried out under warranty, though. 

2020 Skoda Kodiaq front - 69-plate car

Score 95.9%

Only 12% of Kodiaqs suffered a fault. Interior trim and non-engine electrics were the most common problem areas, followed by a small percentage of issues with the battery, bodywork and brakes. 

Although all cars could still be driven, around half took more than a week to repair. However, the vast majority of work was done for free, with just a small percentage of owners paying between £301 and £500. 

See how much you could save on a Skoda Kodiaq >>


Next: the five most reliable large SUVs >> 

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